SYDNEY METRO BILL VOTES … in the Lower House …

 

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SYDNEY METRO BILL VOTES

In the lower House, Wednesday 2nd May – and off to the upper House for its’ first reading the very same day.

Liberals/Nationals voted for this – including the part that would allow the Acquisition of private property for re-development.

Labor and Greens voted NO.

ALSO VIEW: …. MINISTER SEEKING PRIVATISATION OF ALL NSW PUBLIC TRANSPORT

For extracts from Jodie McKay’s speech in response!

https://www.facebook.com/744190798994541/photos/a.761955963884691.1073741833.744190798994541/1745719332175011/?type=3

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METRO BILL PASSED … screenshot of the Vote

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METRO BILL PASSED

May 2018

SCREEN SHOT of the vote – but as spread over two pages – unfortunately not all names of the noes are in the shot.

However, those who have voted contrary to the interests of the Sydney community – the AYES – are here on display!

 

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STRATEGIC MATTERS …the home of the Strategic Week

Sydney Metro’s commercialised future

 

What if the NSW government set up a new state-owned business corporation and handed it sweeping powers that duplicated those of several established authorities, including the power to prepare strategic plans, buy, develop and sell land, run other businesses (including bus services) and, incidentally, manage a railway system?

Well, this isn’t a hypothetical question, as the government has just pushed the Transport Administration Amendment (Sydney Metro) Bill 2018 through parliament. The legislation, which passed yesterday with little fanfare, amends the Transport Administration Act 1988 to constitute the Sydney Metro as a corporation. It also creates the Sydney Metro Board to run the new entity, which can undertake all the activities outlined above.

Why has the government done this? Setting up a government-owned corporation to oversee the development and operation of a privately-operated metro is not so surprising for a Coalition Government, but why give this new body a range of powers that goes well beyond ensuring the metro trains run on time?

Not surprisingly the opposition thinks it has the answer – the metro is being “fattened” for privatisation, a claim the government strenuously denies. However, the government may have another agenda for the Metro, one which may prove to be even more controversial.

 Sydney Metro: open for business

The legislation starts with a clear commercial focus. The “orderly and efficient development of land” near metro stations, depots and stabling yards is given equal top billing as a key objective alongside the delivery of “safe and reliable metro passenger services”.

The rest of the objectives follow this trend. The Metro is to be a successful business, operated “at least as efficiently as any comparable business” with the aim of maximising the “net worth of the State’s investment in the metro”. This imperative is leavened with requirements that the Metro is to “exhibit a sense of social responsibility” and have a “regard to the interests of the community” while conducting operations “in compliance with the principles of ecologically sustainable development”.

The functions listed in the bill (Section 38B) cast the Metro’s net even wider. Clause 3(a) for example allows the Metro to conduct any business even if its unrelated to its functions, as long as it “will further its objectives” – which would seem to indicate that the new Sydney Metro Board will be able to do just about anything it likes. Almost to emphasise this commercial and operational freedom, clause 3(b) states that the metro can operate other transport services “including bus services”, whether these are connected to the metro or not.

Other parts of clause 3 also give the Metro the right to “build, modify, hold, manage, maintain, finance and establish” transport and metro assets. These rights extend to the assets of other public transport agencies; Sydney Metro can also dispose of any assets, other than the metro itself.

Clause 4 gives the Metro authority to acquire, develop, lease or sell land, while section 38D greatly expands on the Metro’s role as a property developer. It’s worth quoting part of clause 1:

Sydney Metro may carry out, finance, manage or otherwise participate in development for residential, retail, commercial, industrial, mixed use, community, public open space or recreational purposes on land in the locality of a metro station, depot or stabling yard, or a proposed metro station, depot or stabling yard….

Division 4 of the bill covers the composition and role of the Sydney Metro Board. Up to seven directors will be appointed by the Minister for Transport, with one appointed by the Transport Secretary. This division also provides for the appointment of the Board’s Chair and CEO. Division 5 permits the Board to appoint advisory committees and also requires it to prepare an annual corporate plan which must be made available in draft form for public comment.

The completed plan is also to be made public, though the Metro is not required to make available commercially sensitive information unless required do so under the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009. The rest of the bill comprises largely procedural amendments to the Act. An interesting exception is the creation of a Sydney Metro Fund to be administered by the Board.

The political response

It’s also worth looking briefly at the debate in parliament. In his speech introducing the bill, Transport Minister Andrew Constance stressed the benefits the new corporate structure would bring in terms of delivering services and carrying out “the orderly and efficient revitalisation of land” around metro assets. He also claimed that the Sydney Metro Board would have the expertise “to maximise Government’s already significant investment in the metro and future growth”. Constance also stated:

Establishing the Sydney Metro as a dedicated statutory corporation is a demonstration of this Government’s commitment to delivering world-class, customer centred transport services to meet the needs of the community, both now and into the future.

However, the Minister largely failed to explain why the new corporation needed to be a property developer or to run enterprises (including bus services) unrelated to the metro. Nobody from the government in either house was able to provide a convincing rationale for providing the new corporation with such a strong commercial focus.

In her reply to the Minister opposition MLA Jodi McKay said the government had “one agenda, and one agenda only: privatisation”. Along with other opposition and cross bench speakers she questioned the necessity of creating a corporation with such sweeping powers, comparing it to the government’s strategy in setting up the Sydney Motorways Corporation and then putting 51 percent of it on the market. McKay said:

Why does this Sydney Metro authority, this Sydney Metro Board, this statutory corporation need the ability to buy or lease land? It needs it because the Minister is fattening the pig for market. If you buy that land and put it within the statutory corporation—hey presto!—you have a big corporation, a big agency, that has bus services and can develop land, and it is in legislation. This means that the Government will try to push this legislation through today because it needs to start work so that, if it wins the next election, it can then sell the Sydney Metro.

 Privatising Sydney Metro – or another agenda?

It is tempting to agree with the state opposition’s assessment of the legislation, especially given the government’s failure to specify why Sydney Metro is being given such broad commercial powers. There is little that the Metro cannot now do as long as its activities support its role as a “successful business”.

It is also true that the government has form in this area, with the partial sale of the Sydney Motorways Corporation, another recently-created arms-length body being put forward as “Exhibit A”. There is also the Transport Minister’s statement that in the future governments won’t need to deliver transport services as the private sector will do a better job.

The broadening of Sydney Metro’s mandate would certainly increase its value if privatisation is contemplated. As many metro systems overseas have shown the real money is likely to be made not in the sale of train tickets but in the ability to redevelop land in the vicinity of train stations. If the Metro has the right to plan these developments and then invest in them – and in doing so can bypass other government agencies which would otherwise have control – it would be able to capture the resulting uplift of property prices, thus turning it into a much more attractive package for sale.

However, privatisation may not be the government’s real goal, even in the long term. While the legislation makes the Metro a more sellable item it also turns it into a new model of streamlined and corporatised quasi-government agency. What if this has been the government’s intent all along?

The government now has a body that will be able to offset much of the cost of future metro construction through property development, capitalising on its advantages as a notional state agency that can operate with limited public scrutiny. As its capital base increases it will be able to make more investment in its own right and become self-sustaining. The government could then start to transfer other government services – for example, bus services (as mentioned in the legislation) – to Sydney Metro.

Inevitably these services would themselves become commercialised, further reducing the cost to government. Over time the government could either continue to transfer other services to the Sydney Metro or alternatively set up new corporations covering other areas of government operation.

In other words, the value to the current government may lie not in selling off the Sydney Metro, but rather in retaining it as a mechanism and model to drive the corporatisation and commercialisation of the rest of the public sector. Many would regard this as a being a much more concerning outcome than even the impact of privatisation.

SOURCE:   https://thestrategicweek.com/2018/05/17/sydney-metros-commercialised-future/

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TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (SYDNEY METRO) BILL 2018 … 2ND READING DEBATE … MINISTER SEEKING PRIVATISATION OF ALL NSW PUBLIC TRANSPORT

 

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TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (SYDNEY METRO) BILL 2018 … 2ND READING DEBATE … MINISTER SEEKING PRIVATISATION OF ALL NSW PUBLIC TRANSPORT

* A LONG READ … BUT THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT! SHARE!!

The legislation here may well explain Ryan Park, Shadow Treasurer’s statement on TV a few weeks back.

Perhaps it was in relation to this? He said words to the effect of – ‘they will sell the land out from under you … ”

It still has to get through the Upper House … however sadly for us Fred Nile often it seems rolls over for the Government having negotiated for what he wants … Ditto the Shooters and Fishers …

With the number of Liberals/Nationals in the Lower House and the tight numbers in the Upper House – is it any wonder that we get such appalling Legislation and Regulations?

The first 30 pages of Hansard can be described as gobsmacking as to the potential impacts … that will have far reaching consequences …

COPIED here parts of Jodi McKay’s speech; the full speech is worth a read.

The debate on this starts on page 1 of the document.

https://api.parliament.nsw.gov.au/api/hansard/search/daily/pdf/HANSARD-1323879322-101672

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY

Wednesday, 2 May 2018

Bills

TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (SYDNEY METRO) BILL 2018

Second Reading Debate

Debate resumed from 10 April 2018.

Ms JODI McKAY (Strathfield) (10:13):

“I lead for the Opposition in debate on the Transport

Administration Amendment (Sydney Metro) Bill 2018. This bill establishes the Sydney Metro Delivery Office as a standalone transport agency and statutory corporation. In reading the Minister’s second reading speech, one would be forgiven for thinking that this was all the bill did, but it does so much more than the Minister has revealed in this House, which is why Labor will oppose this bill.

I listened closely to the Minister’s second reading speech but I did not hear the real reason for introducing the bill. He noted that the Sydney Metro Delivery Office has been working successfully as part of Transport for NSW since 2011.

Why the need for change? There is one agenda, and one agenda only: privatisation.

In his second reading speech the Minister did not say that this agency will be a developer, in that land near a station can be turned into any form of development, including residential high-rise or retail. He also did not say that this agency will be able to deliver bus services that may not even be connected to the metro. He did not say that the path he is taking is one that follows almost to the letter the path that the Government took to sell off WestConnex and to create the secretive Sydney Motorway Corporation.”

And further on …….

”I remind the House that before there was the shady secretive Sydney Motorway Corporation, the Government established the WestConnex Delivery Authority to oversee the construction, financing and management of the motorway. The WestConnex Delivery Authority was a public subsidiary corporation within Roads and Maritime Services.

Back then the Minister for Roads trumpeted how the WestConnex Delivery Authority board offers “market leading construction finance and engineering capabilities”—in the same the way that, according to the Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, Andrew Constance, the Sydney Metro will have an “expertise based board”.

The WestConnex Authority board of directors reported directly to the Minister for Roads, just as the new Sydney Metro Board will report to the Minister for Transport and Infrastructure. In considering the bill, it is important to note that the WestConnex Delivery Authority did not last. It currently does not exist, and I will guarantee that the Sydney Metro will not exist.

The Minister is seeking the privatisation of all public transport in this State. The Minister has said that that is his philosophy. Every action he is taking is about privatising public transport.”

And further on ……

“A year after the Government established the shady and secretive Sydney Motorway Corporation to manage procurement and project delivery functions, it closed the WestConnex Delivery Authority and transferred every single one of the authority’s functions to the Sydney Motorway Corporation.

Now, as I said, the Government is finalising the sale of 51 per cent of the Sydney Motorway Corporation. It is effectively privatising the Sydney Motorway Corporation and WestConnex.

The Sydney Motorway Corporation is a private company. It is constituted under the Corporations Act so it is not subject to the accountability mechanisms of government, and it is not accountable to freedom of information laws.

That is concerning. It means that anyone, including me, who tries to conduct a search on WestConnex under the Government Information (Public Access) Act will meet with a blank wall.

This Government has created a secretive organisation that is not accountable to this Parliament.

However, shortly we will be debating my private member’s bill in this Parliament and that bill seeks to return those accountability mechanisms to the Sydney Motorway Corporation.”

And further on

“The bill allows for the SYDNEY METRO to enter into passenger service agreements, including bus services.

Why would the Sydney Metro corporation, which this bill seeks to establish, want to operate bus services?

The bill states that these bus services do not have to be connected to the operations of the Sydney Metro.

This deceitful and appalling inclusion in the bill effectively gives the new Sydney Metro corporation the ability to take over any and all bus services in this State.

We all know what Minister Constance is about, because we have seen it with the inner west buses. The Government is seeking to set up a Sydney Metro agency to operate bus services.

Bus services have nothing to do with the Sydney Metro, yet in this bill the Minister is ensuring that it will be able to operate bus services—and bus services not connected to the metro. That is what the bill states”

“Why does this Sydney Metro authority, this Sydney Metro Board, this statutory corporation need the ability to buy or lease land?

It needs it because the Minister is fattening the pig for market. If you buy that land and put it within the statutory corporation—hey presto!—you have a big corporation, a big agency, that has bus services and can develop land, and it is in legislation.

This means that the Government will try to push this legislation through today because it needs to start work so that, if it wins the next election, it can then sell the Sydney Metro.

This new Sydney Metro agency can finance, manage and develop land for residential, retail, commercial, industrial or mixed-use development. It is just another attempt by this Government to deceive the community.

Why on earth would this agency, purported to deliver Sydney Metro services, want to build high-rise development or a shopping centre? Why did the Minister not tell us that when he walked into this House to deliver his second reading speech?

Now we have UrbanGrowth NSW, Landcom, the Department of Planning and Environment and the Greater Sydney Commission, all of which are about land development—and guess what?

Now we will have a new authority, a new agency, that can develop land and it is called the Sydney Metro. What a deceitful thing the Minister has done in bringing this bill to this House.

The Government has been incredibly quiet on its plans for development around stations. This is first time that we are finding that the Sydney Metro agency will not only operate passenger metro services but will in fact be a developer of high-rise residential buildings and retail shopping centres.

It is yet another concerning and controversial aspect of this bill that the Minister chose not to disclose when he gave his second reading speech in the last sitting week.

If he were honest with the community—and we know, time and again, that this Minister is not—he would have laid the facts on the table and said, “This is what we intend to do.”

CAAN:

BUT he has hidden that intention and instead given a second reading speech that is full of all of his achievements and how great this infrastructure-spending and infrastructure-building Government is. What a crock that is!

That means that, for the first time in a bill, an agency will be released from having to comply with the Government Information (Public Access) Act—GIPA Act—rules for corporate plans. That is just ridiculous; it is purely about hiding information.

After the Desane verdict in the Supreme Court – what does this mean for their stinking legislation?

Will they re-work the Legislation to try get around the Supreme Court ruling?

That means that, for the first time in a bill, an agency will be released from having to comply with the Government Information (Public Access) Act—GIPA Act—rules for corporate plans. That is just ridiculous; it is purely about hiding information.

 

SOURCE:  https://api.parliament.nsw.gov.au/api/hansard/search/daily/pdf/HANSARD-1323879322-101672

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SYDNEY METRO A PRIVATISED PROPERTY DEVELOPER THAT HAPPENS TO RUN TRAINS … TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (SYDNEY METRO) BILL 2018

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SYDNEY METRO A PRIVATISED PROPERTY DEVELOPER THAT HAPPENS TO RUN TRAINS

TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (SYDNEY METRO) BILL 2018

Following on from WESTCONNEX COMPULSORY ACQUISITION debacle ….

THIS IS GETTING REALLY UGLY FOLKS!

IT appears this is about completing the circle … about expanding Public Transport with a privatised Metro …

The LNP have sold off our Heavy Rail Network from Chatswood to Epping to Hong Kong Consortium apartment developer MTR; extending the line out to Rouse Hill; having decreased the size of the tunnels to prevent access by double deck trains; to develop high-rise towers en route.

DITTO for Sydenham to Bankstown Line.

“We have seen that the plan for the Sydney to Bankstown line to be ripped up and replaced by a metro has all to do with over development and nothing to do with expanding public transport.

This bill gives open slather to the Government to forcibly acquire people’s homes for property development. This is not value capture, this is HIGHWAY ROBBERY.”

VIEW:

http://www.mehreenfaruqi.org.au/green-oppose-sydney-metro-…/

GREEN OPPOSE SYDNEY METRO: A PRIVATISED PROPERTY DEVELOPER THAT HAPPENS TO RUN TRAINS

Posted on 02/05/2018

Greens NSW will oppose the Transport Administration Amendment (Sydney Metro) Bill 2018.

Greens NSW MP and Transport, Roads and Ports Spokesperson, Dr Mehreen Faruqi MLC, has raised alarm over further fragmentation of the public transport network and the broad land development powers being given to Sydney Metro Authority through this legislation.

Dr Faruqi said:

“The creation of a separate Sydney Metro Authority is a further fragmentation of our public transport network, and yet another indication of this Liberal-National Government’s intent on privatising and selling off our public transport piece by piece.

“The far-reaching mandate for Sydney Metro Authority to forcibly acquire and develop land for commercial and residential uses is a cause for serious alarm. Sydney Metro Authority is set be a property developer that also runs trains.

“We have seen that the plan for the Sydney to Bankstown line to be ripped up and replaced by a metro has all to do with over development and nothing to do with expanding public transport. This bill gives open slather to the Government to forcibly acquire people’s homes for property development. This is not value capture, this is highway robbery.

“This bill essentially creates Sydney Metro as a competing body for Transport for NSW, undermining its specified role as a coordinator of policy and services across all modes of transport. This is another blow to any hope of integrated transport planning in our State.

“The fact that Sydney Metro can completely bypass Transport for NSW and the Planning Department goes against the most elementary principles of proper and holistic planning, which should be done in engagement with all stakeholders and departments,” she concluded.

SOURCE:  http://www.mehreenfaruqi.org.au/green-oppose-sydney-metro-a-privatised-property-developer-that-happens-to-run-trains/

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SYDNEY’S NEW DRIVERLESS TRAINS FOR THE NORTH WEST RAIL LINK EXTENSION TO THE SYDENHAM BANKSTOWN RAILWAY CORRIDOR

SYDNEY’S NEW DRIVERLESS TRAINS FOR THE NORTH WEST RAIL LINK EXTENSION TO THE SYDENHAM BANKSTOWN RAILWAY CORRIDOR

November 6 2015

* MORE TO THE POINT….

Transport Minister Andrew Constance was unapologetic about the fewer seats, emphasising that “ultimately this is the very nature of metro-style trains”.
“This is what metro systems do. This is a turn up and go, high frequency service – there is a train every four minutes,” he said.

DOES this sound like “policy by decree”?

DOES it sound like they don’t care?

HERE CAAN gives a background to why it is NSW NOW … the New State of Business is :

-cutting our Public Rail services

-privatising our public rail services;

-overlooked a superior French train

-to utilise a metro train that will only seat a third of its passengers for distances far in excess of their use overseas.

It all appears to tie in with The Greater Sydney Commission which has been created so developers don’t have to go through Councils. Hence the imminent overdevelopment and high density for railway corridors.

SYDNEY’S NEW DRIVERLESS TRAINS FOR THE NORTH WEST RAIL LINK EXTENSION TO THE SYDENHAM BANKSTOWN RAILWAY CORRIDOR

The Metro will travel from Rouse Hill through the North West and comes out at Epping and across to Chatswood.

This train will only seat a third of its passengers; to offset this the Government advises there will be a train every four minutes.

From a reliable commentator CAAN has been advised this train is based on the model that is used elsewhere in the World however they don’t travel the distance they are expected to travel here in Sydney of 60Km or more!

The alternative train to a single deck train was a French double deck train with three sets of doors and did not present the problems that we are told that are preventing the installation of more seats in these carriages.

The French trains travel at the same speed; are very economical and very efficient. Despite this the French never got a look in; unfortunately the Hong Kong Consortium got the nod.

The main issue here is that these trains do not provide seating; they are a short haul train, and that is why they don’t need the seating in Europe and Asia whereas here in Sydney they are going from Rouse Hill to Bankstown (70Km) or even from Rouse Hill to the city (52Km).

Passengers will have to change at Chatswood.

This link provides more information:

http://www.aptnsw.org.au/documents/nwrl_faq.html

If a passenger boards a train at Rouse Hill they are expected to change trains. At the present time they will change trains at Chatswood to go to the city.

The plan is that the train will travel from Rouse Hill to Epping to Chatswood ; under the Harbour through to Central and out to Bankstown a minimum distance of 70Km.

Rouse Hill/Epping 24Km; Epping/Chatswood 13Km; Chatswood/Central 15Km; Central/Bankstown 18Km.

What do you suppose is the reason for extending the North West Rail Link out to Bankstown?

This link spells out why – an extra 36,000 new dwellings over the next 20 years as part of the State Government’s urban renewal project – that’s why!

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/south-west/36000-new-homes-along-sydenham-to-bankstown-rail-corridor-as-state-government-releases-urban-renewal-plans/news-story/fb0cb41d4989224a17a96d8fd5b6ae59

DESPITE the report in “The Conversation” …

https://theconversation.com/the-root-of-sydney-and-melbournes-housing-crisis-were-building-the-wrong-thing-49940

The Baird Government appears to continue to pander to the developer lobby for highrise development.

What is it all about? A reflection of where they are at. Ideologically driven to accommodate their friends in wealthy places.

The Greater Sydney Commission has been created so developers don’t have to go through Councils.

The proposed Greater Sydney Commission Bill 2015 will give greater power to the Commission and the Minister!

(It’s getting worse by the day, isn’t it?)

Once an Urban Renewal Area is approved – as with Bankstown to Sydenham landowners and developers can get land rezoned through the State Government. This proposed Bill appears to shift powers into an unaccountable body under Ministerial direction.

Read more:

Transport Minister Andrew Constance unveils first glimpse of Sydney’s new metro driverless train

WELCOME to the future of Sydney public transport — sleek, fast, driverless trains that can carry up to 45,000 passengers per hour in what politicians say will revolutionise travel.

Minister for Transport Andrew Constance today unveiled the first glimpse of Sydney’s new metro train, with a life-size train model delivered for customer testing on Sydney Metro Northwest.

The 13-tonne life-size train model has been delivered to the Showground Station site in Castle Hill and is a full-scale version of about 75 per cent of the front carriage.

The life-sized model gave commuters an idea of what the trains will look like.

“This is a glimpse of tomorrow’s Sydney,” Mr Constance said. “This is the game changer that’s going to revolutionise train travel across the entire network.

“We know with the advent of metro we’re going to see a world class train delivered right through the heart of Sydney, all the way from the northwest to Bankstown, travelling through the city, with new stations at Barangaroo, Martin Place, Pitt St and Central.”

A key part of the new train is the platform screen door technology, which keeps people and objects away from tracks and allows trains to get in and out of stations much faster.

Inside, customers will be able to see from one end of the train to the other and it will have padded fabric covers on the seating — unlike many metros, which have hard plastic or stainless steel seats.

The new Sydney Metro train won’t have a driver.
It will be able to move 45,000 passengers per hour.

There will also be space for prams, luggage and bicycles as well as wheelchair spaces and separate priority seating for those with reduced mobility.

Mr Constance said it would be a metro train on par with the great cities of the world.

“To give you some comparisons, the existing train network can move 24,000 passengers an hour. The new metro system can move 45,000 passengers an hour,” he said.

“This is going to be innovative, it’s world class. We’re going to see driverless trains in Sydney.”

Fullscreen

First look at Sydney Metro driverless train

Sydney Metro Northwest project director Rodd Staples said the life-size train model will be tested over coming weeks with a range of people including school groups, parents with prams, the less mobile as well as emergency services and engineers.

Customers can have their say on internal features like seating, safety, customer information, lighting, and the grab poles, with the feedback taken on board before the new trains go into full production next year.

Epping MP Damien Tudehope, Minister Andrew Constance and Castle Hill MP Ray Williams unveil the new train.

“It’s all about getting the best customer outcome,” he said.

Mr Staples each train will have six carriages, carrying up to 1100 people, with more than 30 per cent finding seats.

The Sydney Metro Northwest will be open to customers in the first half of 2019, delivering a train every four minutes in peak times.

To have your say on the train’s colour choice visit sydneymetro.info/northwest

 

SOURCE: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/the-hills/transport-minister-andrew-constance-unveils-first-glimpse-of-sydneys-new-metro-driverless-train/news-story/e188c7863eb506fdef45d08eda4afd5e?sv=4143b29c64246d63799738aec15cb2e4

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TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (Sydney Metro) BILL 2018

TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (Sydney Metro) BILL 2018

PART 2

Under this Bill Sydney Metro can acquire and develop land for residential, retail and commercial purposes on land in the locality of an actual or proposed Metro station, depot or stabling yard. …

Page 15 of Legislation Review Digest No.6 of 2018
https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/CommitteesDigest/AddInformation/620/Digest%20No%2053%20-%201%20May%202018.pdf

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ALSO VIEW under the Category of “Compulsory Acquisition & Land Amalgamation”

“So, It has Begun … the Legalised Theft of People’s Homes to enable more Development”

 

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 TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (Sydney Metro) BILL 2018

 

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TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION AMENDMENT (Sydney Metro) BILL 2018

PART 1

Under this Bill Sydney Metro can acquire and develop land for residential, retail and commercial purposes on land in the locality of an actual or proposed Metro station, depot or stabling yard. …

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/bills/Pages/bill-details.aspx?pk=3500

 

Passed though the Lower House 10th April 2018

Also VIEW: “The Sydney Metro NorthWest Tunnels – Death Traps in the Making”

AND:

“So, It has Begun … the Legalised Theft of People’s Homes to enable more Development”

NOW get angy … this is the speech from the rep from Bega:

 

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Hansard/Pages/HansardResult.aspx#/docid/’HANSARD-1323879322-101280′

 

Sydney Metro will also have an important role to play in relation to “place making” in the precincts that will be serviced by the Metro.

In order to ensure transport and land use planning are truly integrated, and to enable Sydney Metro to play an effective place-making role, Sydney Metro will be empowered to assist planning and transport authorities in preparing strategic plans for the revitalisation of land in the locality of Sydney Metro.

Sydney Metro will provide the catalyst for the revitalisation of vibrant and active local communities.

Sydney Metro will be tasked with working across Government to lead the delivery of a world-class metro system focused on customers and great local places driving the State’s economic growth well into the future.

 

And

 

The bill further contains provisions to assist Sydney Metro with its place-making functions.

Sydney Metro will be authorised to carry out, finance, manage and otherwise participate in residential, retail, commercial, industrial, mixed-use development, community, open space and recreational facilities on land in the locality of metro stations, depots and stabling yards.

This will ensure the Sydney metro system is fully integrated into, and forms part of, local communities, providing maximum opportunities for people to work, rest and play close to home, in line with the three cities concept set out in the Greater Sydney Commission’s Greater Sydney Region Plan.

 

And

 

Sydney Metro will continue to act in accordance with the new whole-of-government acquisition standards developed by the Department of Finance, Services and Innovation and the supporting guidelines and procedures developed by the Centre for Property Acquisition.

Clause 38D of the bill authorises Sydney Metro to additionally acquire land by agreement with owners in the locality of a metro station, depot or stabling yard where it is needed for the purposes of carrying out, financing, managing or otherwise participating in residential, retail, commercial, industrial, mixed use development, community, public open space or recreational purposes.

VIEW PART 2

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SECRET REPORT WARNED TOP BUREAUCRATS TO DELAY NEW RAIL TIMETABLE … Epping to Chatswood and Bankstown Line

Patronage on Sydney's train network has surged over the past year.

 

 

SECRET REPORT WARNED TOP BUREAUCRATS TO DELAY NEW RAIL TIMETABLE RE EPPING TO CHATSWOOD AND BANKSTOWN LINE

CAAN has been notified that the full version that is available online was not printed in the hard copy!

There are a few paragraphs missing from the printed version.

PHOTO … The last paragraph on-line shared here is a doozy.

If this is correct, not only less seats, but the article describes a ‘slower metro-type service’
The very last sentence would seem to indicate they intend to spin and feed us weasel words, and an advertising campaign (“needs to be ‘headed off’ by communications in the very near future”.)

SUPPLIED HERE A COPY OF THE ONLINE VERSION AT 20 APRIL 2018

SECRET REPORT WARNED TOP BUREAUCRATS TO DELAY NEW RAIL TIMETABLE

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/secret-report-warned-top-bureaucrats-to-delay-new-rail-timetable-20180417-p4za20.html

EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL NSW PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Secret report warned top bureaucrats to delay new rail timetable

By Matt O’Sullivan 18 April 2018 — 6:30pm

The state’s top transport officials were warned to delay the recent timetable changes for Sydney’s stretched rail network until early this year after independent experts found “simply too many underlying issues which have not been fixed”, a high-level report reveals.

The “sensitive” report, obtained by the Herald using freedom of information laws, also details tensions and resentment between transport agencies, and an unwillingness to relay information to mid-level managers for fear of “politically-difficult leaks”.

Sydney’s rail network suffered widespread delays and cancellations to services in Janaury.

Photo: Louie Douvis
Despite the warnings, the new timetable was introduced on November 26, and later partly blamed for widespread delays and cancellations on Sydney’s rail network in December and January. Sydney Trains has since cut some train services to make the timetable more reliable.

The UK consultants who wrote the report were commissioned by Transport for NSW to assess plans to introduce the new timetable as early as October last year and rate its chance of success.

Following their investigation, they urged senior officials to delay it by several months until early this year due to a “substantial risk of failing to deliver the level of performance which the public will expect”.

Their report warned there was “little room” for rail systems or obsolete equipment, such as signalling, to fail before the “service might disintegrate substantially”, especially during the afternoon peak. This is, in effect, what occurred.

The final report by London’s Railway Consultancy was handed to Transport for NSW in March last year. As well as citing concerns about the practical difficulties of the timetable, the report reveals divides and communication gaps within and between transport agencies.

The report reveals ‘resentment and unhappiness” at Sydney Trains towards the lead agency, Transport for NSW.

Photo: Ryan Stuart

One was an unwillingness by Sydney Trains’ senior management to pass on “sufficient detail” to middle managers.

“One of the reasons for this is political concern about bad publicity which might emanate from the identification of ′losers’ (passenger journeys likely to get worse),” the report says.

“However, the confidentiality imperative (to avoid politically-difficult leaks) has unfortunately led to insufficient consultation during the process, and the ability of other rail staff to contribute to, or challenge, the timetable development.”

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The report also raised concerns that “political worries about particular groups of passengers being disadvantaged” limited the amount of information shared between the lead agency, Transport for NSW, and Sydney Trains.

A second concern was the relationship between Transport for NSW and Sydney Trains. Much of the detailed planning for the new timetable occurred within Transport for NSW’s rail service delivery office, which employs more than 100 people, rather than Sydney Trains. This led to tensions between planners at the two agencies.

The confidentiality imperative (to avoid politically-difficult leaks) has unfortunately led to insufficient consultation.

The report by London’s Railway Consultancy for Transport for NSW
There was “certainly some resentment and unhappiness” at Sydney Trains, the report said. This could have been due to poaching of staff by Transport for NSW, as well as people who were previously at a higher level “now seemingly on the receiving end of instructions”.

But Sydney Trains executive director Tony Eid said the report was outdated and written about an early draft of the timetable, which went through nine further drafts before final implementation.

“While we didn’t agree with everything the report said, it helped us identify a number of actions that were closed out before the timetable was implemented,” he said in a statement.

Mr Eid said the timetable was pushed back by six weeks from last October, and both Sydney Trains and Transport for NSW agreed a start date in November was the best option.

“There were no issues that stopped Transport for NSW and Sydney Trains working together effectively,” he said. “Any suggestion otherwise is simply wrong.”

In relation to the timetable, the report’s authors found that “there clearly are concerns about the probability of its success”, cautioning that “matters can turn nasty very quickly in the political environment and may be irrecoverable for many years”.

“Unsuccessful timetables are remembered, and this one cannot afford to fail,” they wrote.

“We believe there to be a wide range of operating consequences which will be barely satisfactory, leaving [Sydney Trains and Transport for NSW] at the mercy of equipment failures, random incidents, adverse passenger comment and political interference.”

An internal document reveals that delays to Sydney’s trains are likely to be “cumulative and irrecoverable” during peak hours following incidents.

Leaked documents have previously revealed that Sydney Trains warned before the timetable was introduced that delays were likely to be “cumulative and irrecoverable” during peak periods following incidents.

Sydney Trains’ key indicator of success is the percentage of trains arriving within five minutes of scheduled times. That emphasis on punctuality, the British experts said, could lead to “services being planned and operated without due consideration of a rail service which passengers are known to find important” such as journey times.

They recommended senior managers improve the “KPI system so that railway management address a wider range of outcomes rather than just ‘% on time’”.

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Revealed: Sydney Trains warns timetable overhaul to make peak-hour delays ‘irrecoverable’

The timetable will undergo further changes ahead of the closure of the Epping-to-Chatswood line on September 30 for seven months, when it will be converted to carry single-deck metro trains as part of a $20 billion-plus project. Next year, temporary closures of the Bankstown line will also begin to allow for construction of a metro line from Sydenham to Bankstown.

In their report, the British consultants did warn that a “more complex stopping pattern” at stations under the new timetable for trains on the Bankstown line, “before then migrating to a higher frequency/slower metro-type service, is rather illogical”. They said local and political opposition to “metroising” the Bankstown line could turn into disapproval of the new timetable, and “needs to be ‘headed off’ by communications in the very near future”.

Matt O’Sullivan

Matt O’Sullivan is the Transport Reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald.

 

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