BILLIONS IN SAVINGS PROPOSED FOR STATE’s TRANSPORT AS COSTS SOAR

 

AS said before all these infrastructure projects come at a price.

On ABC online there’s an article about Constance floating the idea that fares sometime in the future will be like a Netflix a/c

Is all of this about softening us up for:

-a sell off of transport infrastructure
-ensuring a potential buyer is future proofed by giving them a permanent like cash flow, the ‘subscriber’ having to opt out to stop payments coming from a bank a/c

 

Billions in savings proposed for state’s transport as costs soar

 

 

Raising public transport fares, selling or redeveloping hundreds of state-owned properties and overhauling road levies and taxes are among measures being considered to secure $7 billion in annual savings by the end of next decade to avoid a blow-out in NSW’s transport costs.

A Transport for NSW “reform program” prepared for the state’s Cabinet and obtained by the Herald using freedom of information laws also reveals the agency is proposing ways to cut up to $1.9 billion a year from staff costs within 10 years.

The “sensitive” documents, dated March this year, lay out the stark choices to be confronted by transport authorities and the state government: more money than ever is being spent on transport services, but what the government recoups from fares and other charges is not keeping pace.

The cost to the government of transport services is surging.
The cost to the government of transport services is surging.CREDIT:PETER RAE

 

They show Transport for NSW wants to continue to increase service levels, but is also under pressure to find billions in savings over the longer term.

 

The documents warn that, “without action”, the annual “subsidy” from the government to cover the cost of transport will surge from $5.8 billion last year to $9.6 billion in 2028.

 

By 2028, the amount agencies collect from fares and other charges is expected to cover just 27 per cent of the overall cost of services, compared with 32 per cent last year. “Rising costs and stagnant revenues are projected to require greater government subsidy,” the documents say.

Selling or redeveloping hundreds of state-owned properties are among measures being considered to secure $7 billion in annual savings by the end of next decade.
Selling or redeveloping hundreds of state-owned properties are among measures being considered to secure $7 billion in annual savings by the end of next decade.CREDIT:DOMINIC LORRIMER

Transport for NSW secretary Rodd Staples said the agency had talked to the Berejiklian government about the financial pressures but he emphasised no policy decisions had been made.

“This is sharing with them thoughts and opportunities,” he said.

“In terms of any major policy decision, we’ll have to do that on its merits and I’ll do that in consultation with the ministers and Premier.”

Transport Minister Andrew Constance declined to say what proposals from the transport agency the government was likely to adopt but said commuters were his number-one priority and he expected improvements to frontline customer services.

Transport for NSW secretary Rodd Staples.
Transport for NSW secretary Rodd Staples.CREDIT:WOLTER PEETERS

The documents reveal that transport officials estimate up to $2.1 billion could be saved annually by 2028 from “reform” of road levies and taxes, changes to benefits and concessions for public transport and tiered pricing to reflect a “more equitable user-pays framework”.

A further $2.3 billion boost to Transport’s finances within the next decade could be realised from selling, rezoning, developing or improving about 350 properties “with strong commercial potential”, and from licensing the use of advertising space, intellectual property and data.

And up to $1.9 billion in savings each year by 2028 could come from a renewal of its 28,000-strong workforce “while holding the headcount largely steady at 2018 levels, embracing new skills, new technology and improving customer service and cost recovery”.

The documents do not detail what the proposed measures, such as reform of road levies or changes to public transport concessions, would entail.

Mr Staples said the agency would be taking the lead of the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal on fares, which is considering an overhaul of Opal ticketing for public transport.

“We’ll wait until the IPART work has been done,” he said.

“It is a case of saying to government, if you’ve got financial pressures, and you’re seeking more revenue, here are options available to you to consider.”

Mr Staples said a large proportion of Transport’s workforce would retire or leave over the next decade but the fact it would retain present staffing numbers indicated that “we’ll have more service delivery” as the transport network expands. “We’ll have more assets to maintain but we’re trying to do that with a similar headcount and that delivers us savings,” he said.

In highlighting the financial pressures, the documents describe Transport’s central functions as “inefficient and duplicative”.

They also warn that “significant gains in customer satisfaction are plateauing” as a focus on specific modes, such as trains or buses, limits Transport’s ability to “meet shifting customer expectations”.

The challenges are underscored by forecasts that passenger trips on the rail network will surge by 21 per cent over the next three years.

Transport for NSW hired consultants from BCG several months ago to conduct a four-week review of a new model for the state’s lead transport agency and those that fall under its umbrella such as Sydney Trains and Roads and Maritime Services.

reorganisation has since resulted in RMS losing its status as a standalone agency, and its functions and staff are being folded into new divisions of Transport for NSW.

The documents also identified about $1 billion in annual savings by 2028 from consolidating Transport’s buying power to achieve “better goods and services at lower costs”, and creating an integrated transport network by taking advantage of new modes, digital systems and data.

Matt O’Sullivan is the Transport Reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald.

 

 

SOURCE:  https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/billions-in-savings-proposed-for-state-s-transport-as-costs-soar-20190528-p51rv1.html

CAAN FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Community-Action-Alliance-for-NSW-744190798994541/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

WEBSITE:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/

AUSTRALIA’s NEW RAIL PROJECTS TO DELIVER $28Bn + IN PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT: CBRE

 

HOW WONDERFUL SYDNEY!  But did you figure what will come with it?

 

MTR staff working to get the derailed trail back upright. Photo: Handout

MTR staff working to get the derailed trail back upright. Photo: Unlike the Sydney Metro NorthWest the tunnel appears wide; Engineers have raised warning about the narrow Sydney NorthWest Metro tunnel posing risk to life in the event of a crash or fire!

The Wings, a residential project by Sun Hung Kai Properties' above the Tseung Kwan O MTR station. Photo: Edward Wong

The Wings, a residential project by Sun Hung Kai Properties’ above the Tseung Kwan O MTR station. Photo: Edward Wong

 

SHARE!

 

We invite you to view our Website for numerous reports on what lays behind the new infrastructure of the SYDNEY METRO … it’s all about more development … with a World-wide market for Deve-lopers … their Oyster!

IS the Hong Kong Consortium MTR seeking a like opportunity across Sydney as in Hong Kong?

The LNP Policies remain facilitating this … with the FIRB Ruling allowing developers to sell overseas, and the Real Estate Gatekeepers have been exempted from Anti-Money Laundering Rules in 2018!

Previously with the NSW LNP the foundation for the Sydney Metro was sealed! As early as 2012 developers were able to buy access to a Minister … known as the Dark Lord and the Call of Cthulhu.  A Pro Developer Group known as the “Housing Supply Association” was launched by the Minister …

The Office of Strategic Lands administers the functions of the Corporation  … the Minister for Planning is incorporated as the Corporation!

The Sydney Metro Bill for High Rise passed in the Legislative Council … an extract from Dr Mehreen Faruqi.  She said, “This is neither a holistic approach to transport planning, nor is this value capture.

This is simply a ticket to massive overdevelopment where there are no measures or protections in place for established communities around these proposed metro stations.

Their absolute disregard for communities and democratic planning is galling.

This Government is ripping up the perfectly functional Sydenham to Bankstown rail line, which is publicly owned and operated, to build a metro and hand it over to private operators.”

NOW the Sydney Metro a property developer that happens to run trains … under the Transport Administration Amendment (Sydney Metro) Bill 2018

SYDNEY … we have been warned that the Metro is a death trap with narrow tunnels … view report from John Menadue!

There’s more … SEARCH for:

-Compulsory Acquisition & Land Amalgamation

-The Office of Strategic Lands

-The Sydney Metro Privatised for Development

 

Proposed rail projects are expected to boost real estate development by more than $28 billion over the next decadePhoto: Peter Rae

Australia’s new rail projects will deliver $28b+ in property development: CBRE

SYDNEY METRO: TECHNICAL GLITCH DELAYS COMMUTERS ON NEW METRO

WHAT price a life?  Is there such a thing as a completely bug-free computer system?  Anywhere?

Oh, and Skip the first carriage …

COST Saving … employ Drivers … cost benefit …

SHARE!

 

 

 

Technical glitch delays commuters on Sydney’s new metro

 

 

Several incidents bedevilled Sydney’s new North West Metro on Wednesday including a breakdown, a failure of live transport data and incorrect announcements that train doors were closing on a moving train.

The most severe hiccup on the metro’s fourth day of operations occurred when a driverless train stopped moving between Epping and Cherrybrook after it lost communication with the network’s control system at about 12.50pm.

Driving a driverless train: A customer journey coordinator (left) took control of the train and drove it to Cherrybrook.
Driving a driverless train: A customer journey coordinator (left) took control of the train and drove it to Cherrybrook.

A customer journey coordinator (a driver?) on board took control of the train and drove it to Cherrybrook.

When the train arrived at Cherrybrook, the doors initially failed to open, Nine News reported, but customers were eventually able to disembark and the faulty train was taken back to the depot at 1.14pm for testing.

 

A replacement train was dispatched about 20 minutes later, but a Transport for NSW spokesman said there were some delays as a result of the incident.

 

Frustrated commuters posted images of packed platforms and crowded trains as a result of the day’s issues.

Gaurav Piya@gauravpiya

Picture from Chatswood station and we are now stuck at North Ryde for last 5 mins

See Gaurav Piya’s other Tweets

Passengers on another train travelling between Epping and Macquarie University heard a repeated announcement instructing them to “please stand back from the closing doors” while the train was in motion.

Commuters attempting to cope with the disordered metro system were given little information as live transport information went down in the afternoon.

Garry Narkle due to leave prison

Sydney commuters face delays after technical glitch on Metro

Play video

0:20

Sydney commuters face delays after technical glitch on Metro

Passengers were delayed by 20 minutes when doors on the new Metro line wouldn’t open.

 

Both station train arrival screens and transport apps showed no real time data for late-running trains.

When the data was available, commuters reported on social media that trains were running at intervals of up to about 30 minutes.

A Transport for NSW spokesman said at about 5pm the network was expected to have recovered in time for the afternoon peak.

The incidents were a far cry from the smooth operations the new metro enjoyed on its first few days, when it handled a greater than expected number of passengers without obvious strain.

The new Sydney Metro on its first day, before Wednesday's disruptions.
The new Sydney Metro on its first day, before Wednesday’s disruptions.CREDIT:WOLTER PEETERS

 

Nick is a journalist for The Sydney Morning Herald.

 

 

SOURCE:  https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/metro-train-20190529-p51sis.html

CAAN FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Community-Action-Alliance-for-NSW-744190798994541/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

WEBSITE:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/

CITYRAIL GROWTH ‘BLOCKED’ BY METRO: 2009!

ON one side were the Olympic Planners proposing to improve CityRail to deliver 50 per cent more rail capacity across suburban Sydney …

AND on the other side the self-described ‘Guerilla Group’ of senior bureaucrats who at 2009 were working for the ‘Metro Authority’ and wanted to build Metros worth more than $20B … to create a new transport system to smash CityRail’s workforce …

READ MORE!

SHARE!

 

CAAN Photo:  Metro line outside Rouse Hill to Tallawong

Image may contain: sky, tree, plant, cloud, night and outdoor

CityRail growth ‘blocked’ by metro

 

A report by the consultants Connell Wagner, dated November 2007 but never published by the Government, recommended preserving the Pitt Street corridor so CityRail could build a CBD relief line connecting Redfern and Chatswood by way of a second harbour crossing.

This would ease congestion at the dangerously overcrowded Town Hall station.

Full transport coverage New metro lines under the city could be built without blocking this vital route, but the Government – unknowingly, say rail planners – has allowed the Sydney Metro Authority to claim the Pitt Street corridor for itself, in a move they fear will forever prevent CityRail growing to meet demand from Sydney’s western suburbs.

The report, obtained by the Herald, identifies the Sussex Street corridor as the ”preferred north-south alignment” for a metro, with stations at north Barangaroo, Wynyard, Sussex Street and Haymarket/Central.

It says a metro along the Pitt Street corridor would be ”feasible” but does not recommend it as a solution to CityRail’s congestion crisis.

The decision to ignore the recommendations highlights a three-year struggle between rail factions within the bureaucracy.

On one side are the ”Olympic planners”, who successfully planned rail transport for the Olympics. They proposed improving the CityRail system by completing the ”rail clearways program”.

They also recommended extending the CityRail network with the 2005 Metropolitan Rail Expansion Program, or MREP, by building south-west and north-west rail links, and – later – a “capacity-enabling line” through the CBD to the North Shore and the Chatswood-Epping line. This ”enabling line” would deliver 50 per cent more rail capacity across suburban Sydney.

*On the other side is the self-described ”guerilla group”, a team of senior bureaucrats formerly from the Transport Infrastructure Development Corporation, the Department of Premier and Cabinet, NSW Treasury and the Ministry of Transport, some of whom now work for the Metro Authority.

*The ”guerillas” want to build metros worth more than $20 billion – including the $5.3 billion, seven-kilometre CBD Metroto create a new transport system to smash CityRail’s workforce.

A spokesman for the Metro Authority said the Connell Wagner report ”predates detailed planning for a metro network”.

He said forcing the metro to use the western CBD corridor would prevent the construction of a metro line to north-western Sydney. He added: ”The Pitt Street rail corridor is considered the best option for the development of a future metro network.”

He insisted that both the Pitt Street and western corridors could provide relief at Town Hall.

*But top rail planners, examining the metro’s environment assessment for the Herald, believe the CBD Metro will not ”deliver vital capacity relief for Town Hall station by easing the pressure on the north shore-bound services”, as its website claims.

*Under the MREP, commuters from the Campbelltown and Eastern Suburbs lines could change trains for the job-rich north shore and Macquarie Park areas using new platforms at Central or at an expanded Martin Place interchangebut only if the Pitt Street corridor was linked to the Epping-Chatswood line.

*If the CBD Metro forces CityRail into the western CBD corridor, a key rail planner warned: “These interchanging passengers would be unable to change onto the new line and Town Hall congestion will worsen, which is likely to breach safety standards.”

If the metro occupied the western CBD corridor, as the Connell Wagner report recommended, it could serve the growth area of Barangaroo and allow CityRail to both expand and relieve congestion.

It would also allow a much-needed east-west metro, with interchanges at congestion-free CityRail stations, to cross the city – another option also blocked by the metro plan.

 

2009:  To make a submission to the inquiry write to: Long-Term Public Transport Plan for Sydney, GPO Box 249, Sydney 2001, or email submissions@transportpublicinquiry.com.au, by 6pm on Thursday.

 

 

Image may contain: sky, night and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Outside Rouse Hill Station May 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CityRail growth ‘blocked’ by metro

THE State Government’s decision to push ahead with a metro under the centre of Sydney ignores the recommendations of top engineers, who urged that a corridor beneath the city be reserved for CityRail expansion.

A report by the consultants Connell Wagner, dated November 2007 but never published by the Government, recommended preserving the Pitt Street corridor so CityRail could build a CBD relief line connecting Redfern and Chatswood by way of a second harbour crossing. This would ease congestion at the dangerously overcrowded Town Hall station. Full transport coverage New metro lines under the city could be built without blocking this vital route, but the Government – unknowingly, say rail planners – has allowed the Sydney Metro Authority to claim the Pitt Street corridor for itself, in a move they fear will forever prevent CityRail growing to meet demand from Sydney’s western suburbs.

Full transport coverage

The report, obtained by the Herald, identifies the Sussex Street corridor as the ”preferred north-south alignment” for a metro, with stations at north Barangaroo, Wynyard, Sussex Street and Haymarket/Central.

It says a metro along the Pitt Street corridor would be ”feasible” but does not recommend it as a solution to CityRail’s congestion crisis.

The decision to ignore the recommendations highlights a three-year struggle between rail factions within the bureaucracy.

On one side are the ”Olympic planners”, who successfully planned rail transport for the Olympics. They proposed improving the CityRail system by completing the ”rail clearways program”.

They also recommended extending the CityRail network with the 2005 Metropolitan Rail Expansion Program, or MREP, by building south-west and north-west rail links, and – later – a “capacity-enabling line” through the CBD to the North Shore and the Chatswood-Epping line. This ”enabling line” would deliver 50 per cent more rail capacity across suburban Sydney.

On the other side is the self-described ”guerilla group”, a team of senior bureaucrats formerly from the Transport Infrastructure Development Corporation, the Department of Premier and Cabinet, NSW Treasury and the Ministry of Transport, some of whom now work for the Metro Authority.

The ”guerillas” want to build metros worth more than $20 billion – including the $5.3 billion, seven-kilometre CBD Metro – to create a new transport system to smash CityRail’s workforce.

A spokesman for the Metro Authority said the Connell Wagner report ”predates detailed planning for a metro network”.

He said forcing the metro to use the western CBD corridor would prevent the construction of a metro line to north-western Sydney. He added: ”The Pitt Street rail corridor is considered the best option for the development of a future metro network.”

He insisted that both the Pitt Street and western corridors could provide relief at Town Hall.

But top rail planners, examining the metro’s environment assessment for the Herald, believe the CBD Metro will not ”deliver vital capacity relief for Town Hall station by easing the pressure on the north shore-bound services”, as its website claims.

Under the MREP, commuters from the Campbelltown and Eastern Suburbs lines could change trains for the job-rich north shore and Macquarie Park areas using new platforms at Central or at an expanded Martin Place interchange – but only if the Pitt Street corridor was linked to the Epping-Chatswood line.

If the CBD Metro forces CityRail into the western CBD corridor, a key rail planner warned: “These interchanging passengers would be unable to change onto the new line and Town Hall congestion will worsen, which is likely to breach safety standards.”

If the metro occupied the western CBD corridor, as the Connell Wagner report recommended, it could serve the growth area of Barangaroo and allow CityRail to both expand and relieve congestion. It would also allow a much-needed east-west metro, with interchanges at congestion-free CityRail stations, to cross the city – another option also blocked by the metro plan.

 

2009:  To make a submission to the inquiry write to: Long-Term Public Transport Plan for Sydney, GPO Box 249, Sydney 2001, or email submissions@transportpublicinquiry.com.au, by 6pm on Thursday.

EXISTING RAIL SYSTEM SHOULDN’T BE FORGOTTEN IN RUSH TO SHINY NEW TRAIN LINES

 

 

WITH Sydney’s suburban rail network which will continue to carry the bulk of the city’s rail commuters for decades to come … and under acute pressure from surging patronage … it’s success is as important, if not more, for much of the travelling public than new metro lines … it is imperative that the metro lines are integrated into the existing rail network … that results in improved services overall …

 

 

 

  • ANALYSIS

Existing Rail system shouldn’t be forgotten in rush to shiny new train lines

 

If the first two days are any guide, Sydney’s travelling public has spoken – they want more frequent and reliable train services.

A staggering 140,000 people travelled on a new 36-kilometre metro line between Chatswood and Rouse Hill in the city’s north west on the opening day on Sunday, forcing the *private operator* to quickly put on more trains to clear crowds.

A day later, 21,000 commuters chose to hop on driverless trains on the $7.3 billion Metro Northwest line in the first five hours, significantly higher than the 15,000 to 17,000 forecast.

Passengers on a metro train on Monday morning.
Passengers on a metro train on Monday morning.CREDIT:PETER RAE

 

It left wide smiles on the faces of Premier Gladys Berejiklian and her closest transport advisers such as Rodd Staples, the NSW Transport Secretary and architect of the metro project.

The new line finally offers an option to many people in the north west who have long relied on their cars or buses to get around.

*But it does not alleviate many of the increasing stresses on the existing heavy rail network, nor parts of the city starved of public transport options.

With a fast-growing population, the public’s response to the new line will embolden the Premier to accelerate ambitious plans for a mostly underground metro train line between the central city and Parramatta known as Sydney Metro West.

Sydney's existing heavy rail network is under pressure from strong growth in patronage.
Sydney’s existing heavy rail network is under pressure from strong growth in patronage. CREDIT:PETER RAE

 

Yet it is important that the existing heavy rail system is not forgotten in the rush for shiny new train lines. Sydney Trains’ suburban rail network, some of which is about 160 years old, will carry the bulk of the city’s rail commuters for decades to come.

It is under acute pressure from surging patronage, and will need all the care – and funding – it can get.

And its success is as important, if not more, for much of the travelling public than new metro lines.

With the city’s next metro line due to open by 2024, it is imperative that it and those that follow are integrated into the existing rail network in a way that results in improved services overall.

Commuters want a quick and reliable public transport system. Favouring one form of rail service over another will not achieve that outcome.

 

Image may contain: screen, sky and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Rouse Hill Metro Station platform Sunday 26 May 2019

 

Matt O’Sullivan is the Transport Reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald.

 

 

SOURCE:  https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/existing-rail-system-shouldn-t-be-forgotten-in-rush-to-shiny-new-train-lines-20190527-p51rhs.html

CAAN FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Community-Action-Alliance-for-NSW-744190798994541/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

WEBSITE:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/

SYDNEY METRO DEBACLE: CHAOS ON OPENING DAY OF NEW DRIVERLESS TRAINS

SYDNEYsiders … how many of you are aware that the Metro is not Public Transport?

The Chatswood to Epping Line – which was an engineering Award winning project was sold out soon after the Liberals took control of NSW to the Hong Kong High-rise Developer, MTR Consortium!

Following which the line was expanded out to Rouse Hill and Tallawong

-a more suitable French design train was rejected despite it having double deck carriages

-the tunnels reduced in size so that double deck carriages could no longer be used!

WILL this be like Transurban to gouge $$ from Sydneysiders?

WHY do you figure the Real Estate Sector were made exempt from the second tranche of the Anti-Money Laundering rules in October 2018?

AND will it mean even more high-rise en route, and greater gridlock throughout the Ryde LGA as more and more people arrive from overseas?

SYDNEY METRO PR Team was on board the train(s) this morning but will not be able to cover up this report!

With all the Spin that there would be a train every few minutesCommuters haven’t given the Metro the tick of approval … having sat on the platform for more than half an hour!

 

SHARE!   Think of others!  Let them know!

 

 

Sydney Metro debacle: Chaos on opening day of new driverless trains

Alex Chapman

7NEWS

Sydney Metro's new driverless train line's debut has been anything but smooth.
Sydney Metro’s new driverless train line’s debut has been anything but smooth.Image: Supplied

 

Passengers are slamming the new Metro Trains line as “broken” after experiencing massive delays on its first day.

The driverless northwest Sydney line project opened to the public on Sunday morning.

RELATED: New Sydney metro to open in May

But commuters haven’t given it the tick of approval, with many say they’ve been sitting on the platform for more than half an hour.

 

 

According to one commuter, Daniel, who asked for his surname to be withheld, delays spanned about 45 minutes.

“We got on at 1pm and were gonna do the full loop from Macquarie to Chatswood and back,” he told 7NEWS.com.au.

“But the trains were shooting past the doors and then having to reverse back to line up.

“It’s a farce, I can’t get home.”

He got off at Chatswood and waited at the platform.

“The screen said it would take 15 minutes, but it never counted down and we ended up leaving after half an hour.”

The new driverless trains’ doors are supposed to line up with automatic glass screens to prevent people standing too close to the tracks.

Queues are forming along the strip where commuters can enter the Chatswood station.
Queues are forming along the strip where commuters can enter the Chatswood station.Image:Supplied

 

The line cost the state government more than $6 billion.

Sydney Trains have been contacted for comment.

For more NSW local news, head to 7NEWS.com.au

 

 

SOURCE:  https://7news.com.au/news/nsw/sydney-trains-debacle-chaos-on-opening-day-of-new-driverless-trains-c-133174?fbclid=IwAR2mAjgdg_W-GWXVUacPXQ6xoJfUmBp59lXsWxWL-j-CuraahbLpzgLPFbw

CAAN FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Community-Action-Alliance-for-NSW-744190798994541/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

WEBSITE:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/

WESTERN SYDNEY MAYORS DEMAND NORTH SOUTH RAIL LINK BE FAST-TRACKED … BUT are they on the right track?

IS the Metro the way to go?

No doubt a new North/South line is needed to meet the demand, but why not develop it as part of the existing Sydney Trains network?

As suggested

… from Schofields on the Richmond line to Macarthur on the South line and Leppington on the South West Rail Link via St Marys, the site of the proposed airport so that it interconnects with the network

Doesn’t the distance preclude it from a Metro service?

-with one third seating

 

 

 

Mayors joined forces to demand the North South Rail Link be fast-tracked.
Mayors joined forces to demand the North South Rail Link be fast-tracked.

Western Sydney mayors demand North South Rail Link be fast-tracked

 

 

Western Sydney mayors have weighed in on the future of Greater Sydney and its transformation into a global gateway, demanding state and federal governments fast-track the north-south rail link to establish “new, connected communities in the centre of Sydney’s west”.

 

The local government representatives came together alongside the Urban Development Institute of Australia at a Western Sydney planning conference on Thursday to highlight the significance employment, infrastructure and masterplanning will play in western Sydney’s future.

The North South Rail Link will provide access for commuters from the Western Sydney Aerotropolis at Badgerys Creek to the main Western Line at St Marys and Southern Line near Macarthur.

The NSW Liberal Government promised to investigate extensions for the rail corridor between St Marys, Schofields and the Sydney Metro Northwest at Rouse Hill at the NSW Election in March.

Mayors demanded the Western Sydney Airport business park be linked by a fast-tracked North South Rail Link.

 

Liverpool Mayor Wendy Waller predicted “western Sydney will fail” if all levels of government didn’t work together to deliver infrastructure, jobs and improved quality of life.

Ms Waller said the North South Rail Link would play a key role in cementing the future success of the Greater Sydney Commission’s Metropolis of Three Cities masterplan and communities along the transport corridor.

Hills Shire Mayor Michelle Byrne hit out at the lack of connectivity earmarked by the NSW Government between The Hills and the Western Sydney Aerotropolis through the North South Rail Link.

The North South Rail Link in western Sydney falls short for The Hills. Picture: Transport for NSW

 

The Hills is not part of the western Sydney City Deal or the plan for the North South Rail Link, which is a shame, because the investment and growth of western Sydney is just as important for The Hills,” she said.

“Regional transport is a key focus of our plan for the future of The Hills because a large percentage of our workforce call other parts of western Sydney home.

“We want our residents to have access to the Western Sydney Aerotropolis to ensure that our businesses have a global platform for growth, there is a missing link between St Marys and The Hills that needs to be filled.

Liverpool Mayor Wendy Waller said Western Sydney would fail unless all levels of government worked together to create a connected city. Picture: Robert Pozo
Hills Shire Mayor Michelle Byrne criticised the lack of connection from the new airport to The Hills.

 

 

Penrith Mayor Ross Fowler warned more development was coming to Penrith, “including Penrith Lakes”, and said the North South Rail Link was needed to connect these new communities to other parts of western Sydney.

“The people that are born and bred in Penrith want a connected city,” he said. “They want to retain our rural assets, but also develop a more urban and mixed-use CBD that benefits from the connectivity the Western Sydney Aerotropolis and North South Rail Link will provide.”

Penrith Mayor Ross Fowler said increased development saw a demand for infrastructure.

 

 

Blacktown Council chief executive Kerry Robinson said the next boom town vision for his local government area was in the employment sector.

“There is opportunity for increased development in the commercial and industrial sectors in western Sydney, particularly in Blacktown,” he said. “Every week we add 104 jobs to the economy of Blacktown, but there is still 1000ha of vacant employment land that is up for the taking.

Concept images of property developer BHL’s Northern Gateway City, located at the Western Sydney Aerotropolis at Badgerys Creek.

 

“But the opportunities of a successful western Sydney of the future hinge on infrastructure and growing equity across the city.”

But Campbelltown Council managing director Lindy Deitz said residents in south west Sydney would not benefit from the Western Sydney Aerotropolis, “because the jobs and industries surrounding it will be too difficult to access”.

Ms Deitz said Campbelltown was facing a tidal wave of development, but had not been provided with the infrastructure to cater for it.

Western Sydney Airport train line built by 2026

Supplied video obtained March 10, 2019 of animation of a proposed Metro rail line to the new We…

HONG KONG GOVT LEADER WARNS MTR OF NEED FOR CHANGE!

MARCH 20 2019:  THE HONG KONG GOVERNMENT, a major shareholder in MTR, is ready to step in to ensure that the rail operator strikes the right balance between public and business interests …

Two subway trains collided early on Monday during a test of a new signalling system. One train driver was injured during the trial, which was closed to the public.

A software glitch has been blamed for the signalling fault that led to the collision – the first such accident in 40 years of MTR operations.  A Committee has been set up to investigate the accident …

 

 

Hong Kong leader warns rail operator MTR of need for change

Engineers inspect the wreckage of an MTR train after it collided with another during a test run inside a tunnel in Hong Kong.
Engineers inspect the wreckage of an MTR train after it collided with another during a test run inside a tunnel in Hong Kong.PHOTO: ZUMA WIRE

 

HONG KONG – Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam warned on Wednesday (March 20) that her government is prepared to intervene in the affairs of the city’s metro network operator.

It came as both her administration and MTR Corporation came under further pressure over a train crash that led to a two-day service disruption on the Tsuen Wan line between Central and Admiralty stations.

The leader told lawmakers in a Legislative Council session that when government agencies or listed companies such as the MTR, face a greater workload and calls for more transparency, cracks will show.

“So the governing boards of these public bodies need to have the ability to reflect upon and review themselves,” she said. “If it requires the government’s intervention to instil change, I am more than willing to do so.”

The government, a major shareholder in MTR, is ready to step in to ensure that the rail operator strikes the right balance between public and business interests, she added.

Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan told the media that the government will observe the current mechanism when deciding on the penalty, adding: “We need to look into the seriousness of the incident and appropriateness of penalty in due course.”

Mrs Lam’s warning came after MTR’s management apologised to passengers on Wednesday morning. Neither have said whether commuters will be compensated.

Two subway trains collided early on Monday during a test of a new signalling system. One train driver was injured during the trial, which was closed to the public.

A software glitch has been blamed for the signalling fault that led to the collision – the first such accident in 40 years of MTR operations.

Yesterday morning, outgoing MTR chairman Frederick Ma said during an inspection of the platform that a committee – which includes Thales, the French supplier of the system – has been set up to investigate the accident.

He vowed that the team will “conduct a thorough investigation” and “put safety above all else” before launching the new system.

Thales, in a joint venture with another French company Alstom, was awarded a €330 million (S$506 million) contract in 2015 to upgrade MTR’s signalling system.

The new system was to be rolled out in the later half of this year. But the upgrade is now expected to be delayed.

 

It is expected to take the committee two to three months to study the data arising from the train collision, but Thales will hand in a preliminary report this week.

Services between the two affected stations resumed after the damaged trains were removed from the accident site underground and repair work around Central station was completed.

Public confidence in Hong Kong’s usually reliable rail operator has been shaken by the accident.

The safety of the Thales system has come under scrutiny, as it was also linked to a train collision in Singapore in 2017 – even though both Thales and the Singapore authorities have said that the two accidents were different.

 

SOURCE:  https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/train-services-in-hong-kong-resume-mtr-vows-thorough-investigation-into-crash?fbclid=IwAR30MvgIxHWkyi3ruMazrS5O71d_X27aPvMtwllncgPJrheDD-k1ebBVYFY

CAAN FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Community-Action-Alliance-for-NSW-744190798994541/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

WEBSITE:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/

THE SYDNEY METRO NORTHWEST TUNNELS … DEATH TRAPS IN THE MAKING!

THE AUTHOR of this article is John Maconochie who holds a Bachelor of Engineering with Honours from the University of Melbourne.

He is an experienced Engineer, Investment Fund Manager, Project Developer and Electronic Platform Pioneer!

 

What the Sydney Metro website doesn’t tell you – as Mr Maconochie was informed by NSW Transport metro engineers at a meeting last year – is that the “customisation” for the Sydney Metro project is a considerate downsize from the standard-sized trains Alstom provides to other cities.

*This is due to the dangerously narrow tunnels.

SHARE!

 

Related Article:   John Menadue:  Sydney Metro a Forty Billion Dollar Deception?

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/2018/10/01/john-menadue-sydney-metro-a-forty-billion-dollar-deception/?fbclid=IwAR37337qAEoqXtbxHvnUXUfOMAnfPHOfQ-BsK3TO49JKgiLbhhpt2NjITcw

 

 

The Sydney Metro Northwest tunnels — death traps in the making

Updated  by 

Sponsored advertisement

Gladys Berejiklian and Sydney Metro have cut dangerous corners when it comes to emergency evacuation plans, writes John Maconochie.

IN THE EVENT OF a Metro train emergency – such as derailment, fire or deliberate sabotage – what chance does a passenger have of escaping through the Metro windscreen in the dark along with hundreds of other passengers?

Now imagine this passenger was faced by another three Metro trains barrelling down train tunnels behind them, just minutes apart at a speed of 100 kilometres per hour.

In 2013, NSW Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian committed the NSW Government to the construction of the Sydney Metro Northwest (formerly the North West Rail Link). The project includes two tunnels, each 15 kilometres long, running automated driverless trains from Epping station. Each metro can carry up to 1,152 passengers into the Sydney Metro’s narrow tunnels.

What would an evacuation of these tunnels look like? There are two exits for 1,100 train passengers through the front and rear metro windscreens, with no evacuation staff present.

The tunnels are so tight, their walls would be mere centimetres away from the train windows. Locked side doors and radioed evacuation instructions may engender a panic-driven crowd to crush stampede towards the only exits. That situation cannot be simulated — such tests are known to have been suspended on safety grounds.

Up to three following trains (totalling up to 3,456 passengers) could barrel along in the tunnels behind at up to 100 kilometres per hour. No-one can be “asleep at the wheel” of the driverless train. The vaunted Urbalis signalling system – which minimises the time trains are stopped at stations and regulate the four-minute interval between each speeding train – needs to work perfectly every day.

A Metro derailment, or traction motor, or even gearbox fire, in these tunnels could cause concertinaed wreckage or toxic gases.

What are the chances for 1,100 passengers, including mothers with prams, the aged and infirm, with all their shopping and travelling paraphernalia, in that scenario?

Meanwhile, passengers must remain inside the train carriages because their move onto the 0.8 metre-wide side walkaway through unlocked side doors could cause larger-sized people to be crushed inside the tight kinematic envelope space between the train and the small tunnel walls.

In the six-kilometre-long tunnel between Epping and Cherrybrook stations, no trackside ground level UK-type counterflow walkways exist for emergency and rescue workers. That would have enabled the carriage doors on both train sides to open for direct trackside/walkway passenger escape.

As for the proposed sky trainEvacuating passengers must walk along the tracks up to 13 metres above ground – day or night, in any weather – four kilometres between Bella Vista and Rouse Hill stations after exiting through the front windscreen.

The current safety measure It’s time we examined the desperate scramble to retrospectively jam implausible passenger safety into Sydney Metro’s tight tunnels. We need to take a closer look at Northwest Rapid Transit’s (NRT) detrainment safety risk assessment process and the window dressing “accreditation” from the National Rail Safety Regulator (NRSR).

In June 2017, Premier Berejiklian doubled down, inexplicably authorising the same tunnel design for the Sydney Metro Stage 2 that will run underneath the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

*This decision certainly guaranteed Sydney Metro independence from the existing Sydney Rail, because the tunnels are just too small to run their double-decker trains.

*Sydney Metro safety has been outsourced to NRT to insulate Transport for NSW from responsibility, while also blunting union opposition to driverless trains.

*Safety questions are habitually conflated with the existing and wider Epping to Chatswood Rail Link tunnels possibly in an attempt to bestow some legitimacy on the Metro’s tighter tunnels.

*Passenger evacuation safety could and should have been determined at the original design stage to avoid putting the Metro cart before the horse.

*I believe the NRSR safety accreditation isn’t enough. The NRSR is apparently being pressured to retrospectively accredit the Sydney Metro’s safety plan. Plainly, it is not an independent assessment on its merits.

So here we have a situation where the Government prioritises spending on rebuilding two footy stadiums over metro safety.

Chairman of Infrastructure AustraliaMark Birrell, noted the Government’s urgent need for ‘long-term vision’ — and without it, they’re likely to stuff up future projects such as the high-speed east coast rail.

The Sydney Metro website suggests the trains being built by Alstom for the project are the same as those ‘used in 25 cities including metros in Singapore, Barcelona and Amsterdam’ with some customisations.

*What the website doesn’t tell you – as I was informed by NSW Transport metro engineers at a meeting last year – is that the “customisation” for the Sydney Metro project is a considerate downsize from the standard-sized trains Alstom provides to other cities.

*This is due to the dangerously narrow tunnels.

NSW MP and Engineer Dr Mehreen Faruqi has persistently raised concerns about Sydney Metro, particularly the privatisation of Sydney’s transport systems and their increased likelihood of inefficiency. 

Faruqi had also suggested that the Government, by outsourcing safety, is in breach of a duty of care it owes to the public.

Sydney Metro trains cannot match aircraft U.S. Federal Aviation Administration’s emergency standards that require a full evacuation of passengers and crew to be completed in under 90 seconds using half the available exits.

This Government-mandated Metro roulette is risking thousands of lives. Sydney Metro users are now condemned to 50-odd years of riding a dangerous Metro death trap.

It also reduces any possibility for any future fast rail through central Sydney.
Dwight Eisenhower ran the D-Day landings in Europe before his election as 34th U.S. President.

In a 1957 speech, Eisenhower stated that:

“Plans are worthless, but planning is everything. There is a very great distinction, because when you are planning for an emergency, you must start with this one thing: the very definition of “emergency” is that it is unexpected, therefore it is not going to happen the way you are planning.”

The precise problem with Sydney Metro’s safety plan is that any incidents are assumed to happen exactly as planned.

Sydney Metro’s trains won’t always be able to be brought into stations for passengers to detrain if necessary. Complex electro-mechanical devices (such as driverless trains) don’t actually always work perfectly.

Meanwhile, the Sydney Metro website proudly proclaims:

‘… safety of customers is the number one priority.’

John Maconochie holds a Bachelor of Engineering with Honours from the University of Melbourne. He is an experienced engineer, investment fund manager, project developer and electronic platform pioneer.

  This article first appeared on independentaustralia.net

 

 

SOURCE:  https://railpage.com.au/news/s/the-sydney-metro-northwest-tunnels-death-traps-in-the-making?fbclid=IwAR1owOSFtn6p7izFtUZ0THWM7TregzV7w4rwwWehHKMhbz_XH1peq7tgiDU

CAAN FACEBOOK:

https://www.facebook.com/Community-Action-Alliance-for-NSW-744190798994541/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

WEBSITE:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/