WILL A VOTE FOR SCOMO GOVT EMPOWER THE BEREJIKLIAN MEDIUM DENSITY HOUSING CODE?

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CAAN Photo: a townhouse development 2018 where there was 1 cottage; 2 rows of development. Picture an even more intensive development of 10 terraces for a 600M2 lot as per the Berejiklian Govt proposed Medium-Density Housing Code!

 

WILL A VOTE FOR SCOMO GOVT EMPOWER THE BEREJIKLIAN MEDIUM DENSITY HOUSING CODE?

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DO you want to let Gladys finish the job? To utterly destroy where you live?

THE original Spin (2012) was that there was a need for high-rise at or near railway stations to accommodate the population growth …

BUT they didn’t say where from!

HOWEVER, both NSW INC & their Developer Mates … their appetite whet at the prospect of more … what is promoted as ‘the MISSING MIDDLE’ … with as many as 10 terraces on a 600M2 lot!

AND the newly appointed Planning Minister Rob Stokes recently said he was “not wedded” to any particular law or policy.

But Sydney’s local councils had to plan for medium density or the State Government would intervene, he said.

“They should not read that as code for ‘I’m happy for them not to plan for the future’,” Mr Stokes told the Financial Review.

“I expect them to plan for the future. The best way to accommodate is for councils to plan themselves in Local Environment Plans.

The state only seeks to get involved in councils which aren’t doing that effectively.”

NICE … isn’t it?

WHO is NSW INC and the Planning Minister working for?

The developer lobby, The Property Council of Australia (the PCA)Scomo wrote their policy before he entered politics!

HENCE … on the appointment of Scomo as PM … the PCA seized control of Australia …

THIS is what the PCA had to say about the Medium Density Code for terraces for the overseas buyer market …

“The code is a good policy that has been dragged down by the politics of planning,” said the Property Council of Australia’s acting NSW executive director William Power.

“The code would mean that MEDIUM-DENSITY housing, essentially TERRACES, could be built more easily and in the right places across Sydney – it should be reintroduced and will be by JULY this year in line with updated planning documents from local councils.”

GET IT? If the Federal LNP returns on 18 May … with their policies allowing:

-100% sell-off of ‘new homes’ to foreign buyers (FIRB Ruling)

no Anti-Money Laundering Legislation for the Real Estate Gatekeepers (second tranche)

.the real estate sector exempted by Scomo Govt as recently as October 2018

IT WILL BE OPEN SLATHER FOR GLADYS & NSW INC TO DEMOLISH OUR SYDNEY TOWN

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Read more: NSW Inc b.s. Density complaints are concerns about more cars not more people

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/2019/04/12/10188/

 

Image may contain: tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  For 12 months or more the street has been packed out with trucks; demolition and waste removal and the road and footpath excavated for new drains etc; dust and noise; much inconvenience for the community who have no say with NSW Planning Law changes! WHAT A MESS!

 

Image may contain: plant, sky, tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Access for pedestrians has been removed for months on end;. pedestrians having to find their way along the road.

 

Image may contain: house, tree, sky, plant and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Between the 2 rows of development; the land was cleared of all vegetation and what appear to be garden plots concreted out.

 

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WILL A VOTE FOR MORRISON’s COALITION EMPOWER GLADYS MEDIUM-DENSITY TERRACE CODE?

Image may contain: tree, plant, sky and outdoor

CAAN Photo: a townhouse development 2018 where there was 1 cottage; 2 rows of development. Picture an even more intensive development of 10 terraces for a 600M2 lot as per the Medium-Density Housing Code!

 

 

 

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A VOTE FOR THE SCOMO LNP COALITION WILL EMPOWER GLADYS BEREJIKLIAN MEDIUM-DENSITY HOUSING CODE

DO you want to let Gladys finish the job? To utterly destroy where you live?

THE original Spin (2012) was that there was a need for high-rise at or near railway stations to accommodate the population growth

BUT they didn’t say where from!

HOWEVER, both NSW INC & their Developer Mates … their appetite whet at the prospect of more … what is promoted as ‘the MISSING MIDDLE’ … with as many as 10 terraces on a 600M2 lot!

AND the newly appointed Planning Minister Rob Stokes recently said he was “not wedded” to any particular law or policy.

But Sydney’s local councils had to plan for medium density or the State Government would intervene, he said.

“They should not read that as code for ‘I’m happy for them not to plan for the future’,” Mr Stokes told the Financial Review.

“I expect them to plan for the future. The best way to accommodate is for councils to plan themselves in Local Environment Plans.

The state only seeks to get involved in councils which aren’t doing that effectively.”

NICE … isn’t it?

WHO is NSW INC and the Planning Minister working for?

The developer lobby, The Property Council of Australia (the PCA)

Scomo wrote their policy before he entered politics!

HENCE … on the appointment of Scomo as PM … the PCA seized control of Australia …

THIS is what the PCA had to say about the Medium Density Code for terraces for the overseas buyer market …

“The code is a good policy that has been dragged down by the politics of planning,” said the Property Council of Australia’s acting NSW executive director William Power.

“The code would mean that MEDIUM-DENSITY housing, essentially TERRACES, could be built more easily and in the right places across Sydney – it should be reintroduced and will be by JULY this year in line with updated planning documents from local councils.”

GET IT? If the Federal LNP returns on 18 May … with their policies allowing:

-100% sell-off of ‘new homes’ to foreign buyers (FIRB Ruling)

-no Anti-Money Laundering Legislation for the Real Estate Gatekeepers (second tranche)

.the real estate sector exempted by Scomo Govt as recently as October 2018

.the onshore PROXY aka Daigou will launder the black money for Australian Housing

IT WILL BE OPEN SLATHER FOR GLADYS & NSW INC TO DEMOLISH OUR SYDNEY TOWN

SHARE!!

Read more: NSW Inc b.s. Density complaints are concerns about more cars not more people

 

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/2019/04/12/10188/

 

Image may contain: tree and outdoor

For 12 months or more the street has been packed out with trucks; demolition and waste removal and the street and footpath excavated for new drains etc; dust and noise; much inconvenience for the community who have no say with NSW Planning Law changes! WHAT A MESS!
Image may contain: house, tree, sky, plant and outdoorImage may contain: plant, sky, tree and outdoor

Access for pedestrians has been removed for months on end;. pedestrians having to find their way along the road.

Image may contain: house, tree, sky, plant and outdoor

Between the 2 rows of development; the land was cleared of all vegetation and what appear to be garden plots concreted out.

 

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NSW INC B.S: DENSITY COMPLAINTS ARE CONCERNS ABOUT MORE CARS NOT MORE PEOPLE 

 

NSW INC .. another ‘Canadian expert’ flown in to spin that ‘reliable and frequent public transport and fewer cars’  … is the cure all …

YET as recently as December 2018 TORONTO and VANCOUVER tie as Canada’s two most unhappy cities  … they too have:

-wildly unaffordable housing; populations crippled by debt

-having to commit 70% of income to housing

WHAT they want is less money spent on housing; less foreigners; shorter commutes and lower population density

WHY is Ms Keesmaat no longer the Chief Planner of Toronto  … ?

WHY should we acquiesce to developer greed landbanking our homes to build terraces for foreigners?

WHY should we acquiesce to the high population growth  … with no end in sight?

BECAUSE of rusted-on Voters & WeChat …

ballots and rolls removed, big turnbacks for IVote and Pre-polls, system shutdowns … hm … we have the LNP back in NSW …

WE will be rewarded in July …

Planning Minister Stokes said Councils had to plan for medium density or the NSW Govt would intervene …

 

Image result for jackboot

 

BE prepared Sydney for holus bolus demolitions, asbestos laden waste in trucks, streets packed out with tradie trucks, dust and noise pollution for fugly fortresses …

Image may contain: sky, tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo: The street and surrounding streets packed out with tradie trucks; noise, dust … chaos for 12 months or more; picture a whole street demolished for like redevelopment

 

Image may contain: tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo: streets are packed out daily with waste trucks and tradie trucks

 

 

Density complaints are concerns about more cars, not more people  Michael Bleby

Senior Reporter
Residents will accept density if political leaders show that having more people will make their own lives better, with mass transit and services their neighbourhood would not otherwise have, says Jennifer Keesmaat, the woman who made it happen in Toronto. 
 

Opposition to density was actually opposition to congestion and if people knew having more people in their area meant a neighbourhood with reliable and frequent public transport and fewer cars, it was a sellable idea, said Ms Keesmaat, the former chief planner of Canada’s largest city.

“If you don’t have that narrative, it’s just density for the sake of density. But when we can link infill and link density to delivering on a higher quality of life, then you start to get somewhere,” Ms Keesmaat told The Australian Financial Review.

Denser populations can support better public transport and services, says Jennifer Keesmaat, Toronto’s former chief planner.  Arsineh Houspian

 

“The conversation in your city starts to shift. It’s no longer about ‘I don’t want those people here’, it’s more ‘If there’s more density then maybe there are more things I can do within walking distance of my home’.”

The experiences of Ms Keesmaat, Toronto’s chief planner from 2012 to 2017 and runner-up in the city’s mayoral election last year, have lessons for Sydney and Melbourne, which are struggling to overcome opposition to greater density in the established suburbs best placed to support a higher population.

The high-rise redevelopment of many industrial sites in Toronto’s CBD – an area likely to grow from the current population of about 300,000 to 500,000 over the next 15 years – had created a city that could do this, she said.

 

“We have begun to deliver on the promise because 75 per cent of those residents that live in the downtown either walk, cycle or take a short transit ride to get to work every day,” said Ms Keesmaat, during a visit sponsored by consultancy Ethos Urban.

“So we’ve essentially demonstrated that when we create a complete walkable community that we can eliminate the bane of modern life, which is a long commute.”

A longer-term challenge for Toronto, as with Sydney and Melbourne, is to create medium-density housing in longstanding areas of low density.

The Canadian city is doing this – 25 per cent of the city’s permit applications in the approval process or approved but not yet built are for mid-rise developments in designated suburban corridors.

 

That’s not the case in Sydney, where a fast-track medium-density planning code was largely shelved before last month’s state election.

“The code is a good policy that has been dragged down by the politics of planning,” said the Property Council of Australia’s acting NSW executive director William Power.

“The code would mean that medium-density housing, essentially terraces, could be built more easily and in the right places across Sydney – it should be reintroduced and will be by July this year in line with updated planning documents from local councils.”

Newly appointed Planning Minister Rob Stokes on Tuesday said he was “not wedded” to any particular law or policy. But Sydney’s local councils had to plan for medium density or the state government would intervene, he said.

“They should not read that as code for ‘I’m happy for them not to plan for the future’,” Mr Stokes told the Financial Review.

“I expect them to plan for the future. The best way to accommodate is for councils to plan themselves in local environment plans.

The state only seeks to get involved in councils which aren’t doing that effectively.

Michael Bleby writes on real estate specialising in construction, infrastructure, architecture based in our Melbourne newsroom.

SYDNEY COUNCILS ADDRESS COMMUNITY OPPOSITION WITH THE USE OF HERITAGE ORDERS TO HALT OVERDEVELOPMENT

 

FROM the comments it was suggested that the owner come developer renovate the existing Californian Bungalow and either rent it or live in it instead of demolishing it for a triplex!

 

The community objects to their neighbourhoods being devalued!

 

AND another suggestion was for whole streets to have Heritage Orders placed on them to stop rapacious so-called developers destroying them.

Another Commentator said:

TOO many Federation bungalows have been demolished to be replaced by “new homes” in Epping, Eastwood, and Denistone areas for foreign buyers with no connection to these areas!

 

THE COMMUNITY IS ‘OVER’ THE GROWTH TO BENEFIT DEVELOPERS AND THEIR FOREIGN CLIENTELE

 

Sydney councils accused of using heritage orders to halt development

 

*Victor Yang claims he has been locked in limbo since the City of Ryde council put an interim heritage order on his 100-year-old house in the north-west Sydney suburb of Denistone. He says the order has halted his plans to redevelop the block and pushed him to the verge of bankruptcy.

Victor Yang and his wife Fiona say their Denistone house had no heritage protections when they bought it in March 2018.
Victor Yang and his wife Fiona say their Denistone house had no heritage protections when they bought it in March 2018.CREDIT:JAMES BRICKWOOD

 

“We’ll lose our home through no fault of our own,” Mr Yang said. “This is about fairness, not development politics.”

*But the City of Ryde said the freeze order was necessary to protect the home, as councils aim to strike a balance between Sydney’s development rush and protecting the city’s heritage precincts.

 

 

Mr Yang said his house had not been covered by heritage protections when he and his wife bought it in March last year.

*He was shocked when the council put the interim heritage order on his house for a maximum of 12 months last September, soon after he had lodged a development application to subdivide. He plans to demolish the house eventually and to build a duplex or triplex.

Interim heritage orders are aimed at preventing significant changes or damage to properties while authorities decide whether the sites should be heritage listed.

The council cited community opposition and independent heritage advice that found the house was a good example of an inter-war Californian bungalow and had “cultural heritage significance”.

Mr Yang said: “How can it be right for a homebuyer to find, after they’ve bought their home, that new conditions apply? Right now, anyone in NSW buying an older home could find themselves in this position.”

The City of Ryde council cited independent advice that found the house had heritage significance and was a good example of an inter-war Californian bungalow.
The City of Ryde council cited independent advice that found the house had heritage significance and was a good example of an inter-war Californian bungalow. CREDIT:JAMES BRICKWOOD

 

Independent Ryde councillor Roy Maggio opposed the interim heritage order on the house and said it was an “unfair process”. “There should have been more discussion with the applicant,” he said.

The mayor of the City of Ryde, Jerome Laxale, pushed for the house’s protection. He has seized on community concerns over perceived overdevelopment as Labor’s candidate for the state seat of Ryde.

Cr Laxale declined to comment. A City of Ryde spokeswoman said the council “takes the protection of buildings and places of heritage importance seriously” and Mr Yang’s house was “no exception”.

She said the council had put the order on the property “and also obtained a court injunction to protect it from irreparable damage while council seeks to officially place it on its heritage list”.

“Council does not resile from its position to protect the property as it is an important historical asset for the community.”

Lawyer Helen Macfarlane, who is a partner in planning and environment law at Sydney firm Addisons, said there had been a rise in the past several years of councils imposing interim heritage orders when a development application for a site was lodged, or when a tightly held property was put up for sale.

“It’s become a form of de facto development control,” she said.

She said that councils were not obliged to tell the landowner they had applied for an interim heritage order and they could be applied swiftly.

The council spokeswoman said the council was considering further legal action to protect the home “as the property continues to suffer damage”.

*Mr Yang said he hadn’t “done anything except maintain the tarpaulins on the roof”.

The dilemma over preserving heritage homes slated for redevelopment has been echoed in other parts of Sydney.

The independent mayor of North Sydney, Cr Jilly Gibson, said the council had recently pushed for the state government to put an interim heritage order on a Neutral Bay home.

Cr Gibson said the order was “a last resort” in response to a proposed development that residents feared would “drastically change” the character of the harbourside street.

“I support high-rise development in appropriate locations. The flipside of that is we have the responsibility to work tirelessly to protect the character of our conservation areas.”

Megan Gorrey is the Urban Affairs reporter at the Sydney Morning Herald.

 

 

SOURCE:  https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/sydney-councils-accused-of-using-heritage-orders-to-halt-development-20190313-p513v4.html?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3VRrOEDaXir5IsRKdwYqAHQuBUficayZAuWQ2gVk9bYzA-0cyL60zp7fQ

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Residents urged to have their say on ‘overdevelopment’ in shire in election lead-up

 

UPDATE on OVERDEVELOPMENT in ‘The Shire’ … please sign the petition and share this article  (View link below)

Residents urged to have their say on ‘overdevelopment’ in shire in election lead-up

The organisers of a protest meeting against “overdevelopment” in Sutherland Shire say the state election provides residents with a chance to demand change.

 

Marcela Bilek and Andrew Mathas organised the street meeting in response to two medium density housing proposals in Kurrajong Street, Sutherland, where they have lived for nearly 20 years.

​Residents from other parts of the shire with similar concerns were also invited by social media.

 

About 90 people, including mayor Carmelo Pesce, several other councillors and state election candidates –  although none of the Liberals – attended.

 

Ms Bilek said they were happy with the turnout of about 90 people.

 

“It had been raining steadily since early morning on that day and the attendees knew that this was to be an outdoor meeting with no wet weather contingency plan,” she said.

 

Ms Bilek said those who attended were told of an online petition that had been launched, “calling for legislation that would bring in responsible development in the lead up to the election”.

 

“There are further actions that eventuated from the meeting including the formulation of plans to attend other public events leading up to both the state and federal elections,” she said.

 

“The federal election is relevant because of the climate change implications of the building practices encouraged by the current legislation.”

 

Ms Bilek said changes imposed on local councils by the state government had resulted in residents with development concerns “having nowhere to go”.

 

 

IN 2015 … an example of what homeowners across the Shire and Greater Sydney have been confronted with during the NSW Government “Growing Sydney” … higher density housing for the foreign buyer market …

 

Sinking feeling: Marilyn Batman's side lane and fence collapsed into the development site next door. She is blaming Sutherland Shire Council for allowing excavation right up the the boundary. Picture: Jane Dyson

 Photo: 2015:  Sinking feeling: Marilyn Batman’s side lane and fence collapsed into the development site next door. She is blaming Sutherland Shire Council for allowing excavation right up the the boundary. Picture: Jane Dyson

Extract from “It’s an absolute violation – Excavation puts Home on the Brink”

The residents live in Caringbah. The corner block next to their property was being redeveloped as 14 townhouses with basement parking.

 

Sutherland Shire Council approved the $4.9 million development in September, 2013.

It approved a modification to the plan including changes to the basement late last year.

 

Several weeks ago holes started appearing in the ground on the northern side of the Batmans’ property. When they alerted the developers these were patched up.

 

But on Saturday, May 23, they awoke to find the utility lane up the side of their house including their fence and washing line had collapsed into the excavation next door.

 

“The whole laneway had fallen away including the Colorbond fence which left the side of our back patio exposed,” Mrs Batman said.

 

“We didn’t realise they would be able to excavate right up to our property line. All other properties have a setback.”

 

Read more:  https://www.theleader.com.au/story/3132437/its-an-absoloute-violation-excavation-puts-home-on-the-brink/

There have been a number of reports to us at CAAN of people leaving the Shire due to villas and townhouses being built up close to their homes robbing them of the amenity they have paid for.  Whole streets have been redeveloped in the Shire!

2019

Sutherland Shire Council has had a very bad name so much so that this year …. with so many developments like this that now in February 2019 …

 

Fighting back: The council and residents are taking action over medium density developments. Picture: John Veage

 

“Sutherland Shire Council has warned it may seek to ban townhouse, villa and dual occupancy developments in R2 low density zones unless the shire is permanently exempted from a new state government housing code.”

Apartment developments are also causing much grief with residents facing a future of 20M apartment buildings outlook!

Across the Shire currently residents are fighting a DA in Jannali for 18 townhouses on 2 blocks in an R2 zone with one vehicle access point from a cul de sac.

Sylvania residents are trying to stop a DA for 9 4-bedroom townhouses and 3 3-bedroom villas.  Each villa has an attic; designed to evade the 60/40 rule; the new homes will look over the backyards of some dozen existing homes.

Caringbah another contentious townhouse DA where, in September 2018, the Sutherland Shire Local Planning Panel gave the developer four months to come up with “a more skillful design” to minimise adverse impacts on adjoining properties.

Read more:  https://www.theleader.com.au/story/5926683/housing-ban-threat/

 

 

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EAST HILLS: DEVELOPER CENTRAL: THE BATTLE FOR SYDNEY’s MOST MARGINAL SEAT

SHARE to let East Hills Constituents know the ALP will scrap the Medium-Density Housing Code if it wins the NSW Election!

If the Libs return East Hills streets will become a war zone of more developer landbanking, demolition chaos and rows of blocks of flats, terraces, townhouses, triplex, duplex … “a house was pulled down and 17 villas went up!”

Ask yourself can the LNP be trusted?

East Hills witnessed their ‘dirty politics’ back in 2015 with unlawful election donations …

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/nsw-liberals-ordered-to-repay-250-000-in-unlawful-election-donations-20180227-p4z20c.html?fbclid=IwAR0pYrgWC_lX8qoOyolItvE0-bfzvp-2TtXn0WVSeMopztt34dVfoF8wHik

 

And a disgraceful slur campaign …

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/glenn-brookes-paedophile-slur-mp-to-stand-aside-during-investigation/news-story/f5eca2695daeca45d98c6f7a61934cfe?fbclid=IwAR1Vl0PCTs-BJ-i_O016Z5ybfZADwUsHbPy3jPeWR-6aBSoMWqwEuuQexKg

 

‘It’s become a war zone’: the battle for Sydney’s most marginal seat Garry Maddox

 

Take a left at Neptune, a right at Mars and swing by Uranus. That’s where you’ll find one of the centres of the universe – Sydney’s most marginal seat – at the NSW election in less than three weeks.

East Hills in south-western Sydney, including the cosmically named streets of Revesby and Padstow, was a Liberal win by just 372 votes at the last election. And if Opposition Leader Michael Daley is to have any chance of seizing government from Premier Gladys Berejiklian, the ALP will have to reverse that result.

Liberal candidate Wendy Lindsay and Labor candidate Cameron Murphy are running for the East Hills seat in south-western Sydney. 
Liberal candidate Wendy Lindsay and Labor candidate Cameron Murphy are running for the East Hills seat in south-western Sydney. CREDIT:JANIE BARRETT

 

Last time the seat had one of the country’s most vicious elections when Labor’s Cameron Murphy was the subject of a smear campaign before losing to sitting member Glenn Brookes.

Mr Murphy’s posters were defaced with “paedophile lover” and other slurs – apparently a reference to his presidency of the NSW Council for Civil Liberties – which led to former Liberal campaign manager Jim Daniel facing charges. While acquitted of distributing unauthorised pamphlets, he admitted emailing other denigrating material.

 

Mr Brookes, who attracted more controversy when he was found to have breached campaign finance laws, is not recontesting. Late last year, he reportedly approached maverick federal MP Craig Kelly – then facing a pre-selection challenge – to replace him but it was rejected as a “a ­ridiculous idea”.

That leaves voters in East Hills, where key issues include the number of medium-density homes replacing older-style houses and cost-of-living pressures, with two major party candidates who live around the corner from each other in Padstow with their spouses and two children.

But they are sharply contrasting in so many other ways.

"People are sick of being treated badly" ALP candidate Cameron Murphy.
“People are sick of being treated badly” ALP candidate Cameron Murphy.CREDIT:JANIE BARRETT

 

Mr Murphy, a barrister who is the son of former Whitlam government attorney-general and High Court Justice Lionel Murphy, is standing again. He needs a swing of just 0.4 per cent to win.

A member of the Labor Party for more than two decades, Mr Murphy has been campaigning full-time for nine months. He has been a member of the Anti-Discrimination Board of NSW and a member of the Consumer, Trader and Tenancy Tribunal of NSW.

Liberal candidate Wendy Lindsay has scaled back her three-days-a-week job as manager for Bankstown-Auburn Community Radio to campaign. A former independent candidate at a council election, she has been a member of the Liberal Party for “the last six months or so”.

"The main issue for people that live in the area is development": Liberal candidate Wendy Lindsay.
“The main issue for people that live in the area is development”: Liberal candidate Wendy Lindsay.CREDIT:JANIE BARRETT

 

A past president of Padstow Park Public School P&C and East Hills Woman of the Year in 2015, Mrs Lindsay has another job that adds a splash of colour to the campaign – she plays June Carter in the Johnny Cash tribute act Cash Only. In January, they performed at their 11th consecutive Tamworth Country Music Festival.

Last month, the campaign turned into a burning ring of fire again when Mrs Lindsay was left shaken by a verbal clash with an angry commuter at Revesby railway station. She said a woman abused her repeatedly – saying “the Libs are refugee abusers and you’re disgusting” – then broke an A-frame election poster with a kick.

According to the last census in 2016, East Hills is very much middle Sydney in real estate terms. Residents had almost exactly average monthly mortgage repayments and rents compared to Greater Sydney, though with a median family income of almost 10 per cent less.

It’s an area dominated by older-style houses – with an increasing number of medium-density homes – and relatively few apartments. While the census showed it had a much higher percentage of people born in Australia than average, there were substantial immigrant communities from Vietnam, Lebanon and China.

 

In a clue to a major issue for a seat intersected by Milperra Road and the M5 motorway, the census showed many more people than average drove to work.

While believing residents are hurting from higher electricity prices and tolls, Mr Murphy says a key issue at the election is neglect.

“When they get on a train, they get a crappy train service in this area,” he says. “We’ve had a reduction in our express services. We cop all the S-Sets while other parts of Sydney get nice airconditioned trains.

“We’re copping all of the development being pushed into our area where other parts of Sydney – in the north shore and eastern suburbs – are getting off very lightly. We haven’t had any improvements to our hospital while in other parts of Sydney you’ve got billions of dollars being spent building brand new hospitals.

“People are sick of being treated badly. If I do get up then it’s that. My opponents have done nothing in eight years to fight for the area.”

Mr Murphy says Canterbury-Bankstown has been targeted for 13,250 new homes by the Greater Sydney Commission, while Hunters Hill has just 150.

“It’s become a war zone in suburban streets,” he says. “You can’t park in your own street. If duplexes and other higher-density development go in, what ends up happening is you might have five adults with three to five cars out on the street.”

Mrs Lindsay also believes residents are feeling the pain of medium-density development.

"It's getting hard to park in Panania and Revesby": Kim Pryde from Picnic Point.
“It’s getting hard to park in Panania and Revesby”: Kim Pryde from Picnic Point.CREDIT:JANIE BARRETT

 

“The main issue for people that live in the area is development and ensuring that we keep our green leafy spaces,” she says. “The duplexes have been a definite problem in some of our streets that are quite narrow, just with parking. That’s created a few headaches.

“And people just want to have a nice life – be able to pay their mortgage, have a job, get their kids well-educated.”

But hasn’t this development happened under a Liberal government?

“It’s happened under a Liberal government but it’s also happened under a Labor-dominated council,” Mrs Lindsay says. “We need to have sensible development because we need to keep the villages alive. We don’t want everyone going to Bankstown and Miranda to do their shopping.”

Mrs Lindsay says the government has announced 400 new spaces for a commuter car park at Revesby to overcome some of the pressure from train timetable changes.

"Up where we live, there was a house pulled down and 17 villas went up": Max and Joan Part from Picnic Point.
“Up where we live, there was a house pulled down and 17 villas went up”: Max and Joan Part from Picnic Point.CREDIT:JANIE BARRETT

 

“I’m really hoping people look at what the Liberal government has done for the last eight years and the infrastructure projects that are almost there,” she says. “I really hope [the Premier] does get in so she can cut the ribbon on them. It would be awful to see a Labor person cutting the ribbon on some of these things that they’ve worked so hard to do.”

Shopping at Revesby, Nadene Marouf sees the environment, public transport, neglect of the area and tolls as issues that will influence how she votes. “The M5 is a big thing,” she says. “You already have to pay for parking everywhere, let alone the M5.”

Max and Joan Part, retirees from Picnic Point, are worried about over-development since they moved from Hurstville because it was built out.

“We thought we’d come over here, found a nice quiet street and it’s not quiet any more,” Mr Part says. “We’ve been built out again. Up where we live, there was a house pulled down and 17 villas went up.”

Kim Pryde, from Picnic Point, agrees there is too much development.

“It’s getting hard to park in Panania and Revesby,” she says. “They’re building these big houses and they don’t have the parking facilities on there then they spill out onto the streets.”

EAST HILLS

Covers 39.5 square kilometres including Bankstown, Bankstown Aerodrome, Bass Hill, Condell Park, East Hills, Georges Hall, Milperra, Padstow, Padstow Heights, Panania, Picnic Point, Revesby, Revesby Heights and Yagoona.

MP Glenn Brookes (Lib) is not standing again

Swing required: 0.4 per cent.

Candidates: Wendy Lindsay (Lib), Cameron Murphy (ALP), Sue Virago (Greens), Heather Barnes (Animal Justice Party), Christopher Brogan (Independent), Owen Butt (Christian Democratic Party)

 

Garry Maddox

 

Garry Maddox is a Senior Writer for The Sydney Morning Herald.

SCOMO … Looks like A Liability for NSW Marginals of East Hills and Ryde …

EAST HILLS VOTERS have every reason to fear the return of a Scomo Government on alleged border protection …

ARE they not aware that 2.2 Million VISA Holders have flown in to Oz, and are currently here? AND that when they buy our real estate they can get ‘Permanent Residency’?

Scomo blabbed he would cut migrants by 30,000 to 160,000 … compare that to 2.2 MILLION Visa Holders …

RYDE VOTERS … do they want more OVERDEVELOPMENT?

Seriously? With the LNP deferred Medium-Density Housing Code to add Manor Houses, rows of terraces and townhouses, and more duplex like these?  F…rrkk … if the Libs return!

Lack of public transport … gridlock … and delays of 30 minutes to reach the main roads  …

 

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Chinese tourists and international students help drive asylum claims up 311 per cent

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Australia’s Slave Wage Economy

Work Visa Holders, which documented systemic abuses of Australia’s temporary visa system ….. We have onshore today 2.2 million Temporary Residents (TR) long stay.

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2018/05/australias-slave-wage-economy/

 

 

Image may contain: sky, cloud, house, tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Ryde LGA

 

 

Scott Morrison proves a vote winner in marginal NSW election seat

 

EXCLUSIVE: Polling in Sydney’s most marginal seat shows PM Scott Morrison is a surprise weapon for Gladys Berejiklian in the NSW election.

 

An exclusive YouGov Galaxy poll conducted for The Daily Telegraph found Labor has not yet gained the ground it is looking for in the key battleground seat of East Hills, with a swing to the ALP of just 0.4 per cent leaving the parties deadlocked at 50-50.

Scott Morrison’s policies on border control appear to have resonated with NSW voters. Picture: AAP

 

East Hills voters were worried about migration and population and regard Mr Morrison’s impact on their state vote favourably — an apparent nod to his tough stance on border protection.

The result is a minuscule 0.4 per cent swing to Labor that leaves the most marginal Liberal seat in the state on a 50/50 knife edge.

However, the polling reveals a tale of two cities, with voters in Ryde — a seat impacted by massive overdevelopment — saying Mr Morrison is a net negative.

A swing of 8.5 per cent to Labor still leaves the government comfortably in front, 53-47, on two-party preferred basis.

The result in East Hills suggests PM Morrison’s relentless campaign on border protection could be helping his NSW counterparts in some parts of Sydney.

 

The poll canvassed 508 voters in East Hills and 534 voters in Ryde last week.

Primary support for the new Liberal candidate Wendy Lindsay in East Hills is 44 per cent, just ahead of Labor’s Cameron Murphy on 42 per cent.

A total of 35 per cent of people said the federal government’s performance made them more likely to vote Liberal and 31 per cent said less likely — a net positive score of +4 per cent.

This is despite Premier Berejiklian signalling she wanted a clear separation from federal issues during the election, repeatedly declaring she would “run her own race”.

Liberal ministers and MPs have privately voiced fears that chaos at a federal level would impact the state vote. However, the result in East Hills calls this into question.

Primary support for the government in the electorate of Ryde has slumped by more than 10 points since the last election — but still not enough for Labor to win the seat.

Sharon Cashel, 47, from Ryde, with her son Ashton, and his friends Jessica and Klara, all 5.

 

With 43 per cent of the primary vote, NSW minister Victor Dominello still leads the Labor candidate and local mayor Jerome Laxale on 36 per cent.

Despite the 8.5 per cent two-party preferred swing, the Liberals will be relieved by this result, with development issues biting in Ryde and prompting government worries the seat could fall.

 

Image may contain: sky, tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Duplex Ryde LGA

 

Image may contain: house and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Duplex; looks like a block of flats; Ryde LGA

 

Mr Morrison’s influence has a net negative impact in the lower north shore seat.

In Ryde, 30 per cent of voters were more likely to vote Liberal and 37 per cent less likely on the basis of the federal government’s performance — a net negative score of -7 per cent.

In Ryde, the key issue on voters’ minds was urban development (27 per cent), followed by infrastructure (20 per cent).

 

Image may contain: sky, skyscraper, tree, shoes and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Greenland Lachlan’s Line, Macquarie Park/North Ryde

 

In East Hills, the number one issue for voters was migration and population (33 per cent). This was followed by health (18 per cent) and urban development (15 per cent).

PART OF THE IN-CROWD

By Henry Lynch

They are migrants themselves, but Jai and Aiko Bhatt are aware of the issues that a growing population places on Sydney suburbs such as East Hills.

They have called on the State Government to better manage infrastructure to meet demand.

The couple will soon move from Canterbury into the East Hills electorate with Mr Bhatt having lived in Australia for 13 years.

“(Migration is) good, hopefully we are still open for people who really need help … (but) they need to make more space outside cities. Australia is getting really packed,” Mr Bhatt, 35, said.

Jai Bhatt and Aiko Bhatt, who are in the East Hills electorate, are migrants themselves but still concerned about the impact of ongoing migration on overcrowding in Sydney.

 

The couple, both registered nurses, said cramming new developments into the suburbs wasn’t the solution to the city’s overcrowding issues.

“Yes (growing population is good) if you have the infrastructure, but not if you have to build lots of units,” Mr Bhatt said.

“That’s the reason people want to live in a house, they don’t want dense population around them.”

 

SOURCE:  https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/opinion/editorial-scott-morrison-revival-a-factor-in-nsw/news-story/cf697ff2865663bbe654eb255e1bb7a2

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BOARDING HOUSES: DOMINO EFFECT … SHARE!

THE Domino Effect is being felt right across Sydney Town … with Deve-lopers & RE Agents having skewed government policy to sell 100% of “new homes” to foreign buyers, gained exemption from Anti-Money Laundering, and thus having locked a Whole Cohort of Australians out of Home Ownership …

They now propose “Affordable Housing in the form of Boarding Houses, and Build-To-Rent” even for Key Workers, Professionals to become life-long Tenants!  WT *!

AND … if the LNP return in NSW after 23 March 2019 the Medium-Density Housing Code for rows of terraces, townhouses, Manor Houses (blocks of flats), triplex, duplex etc will be back on the drawing board … our streets and suburbs will be land-banked and demolished for Medium-Density for the 100% sell off overseas to continue!

VIEW:

BOARDING HOUSES: Communities rise up against development in R2 Zones

Boarding Houses are causing real problems through R2 in Sutherland Shire.

CAPPING to 12 Rooms –  an improvement from 100 rooms, however such developments are of a large bulk impacting their neighbours in an R2 zone …

WHY was the SEPP for Boarding Houses introduced back in 2009 if it were not for the  Howard Government in the late 1990s giving the Chinese Middle Class “flexible citizenship” for investment in our education and real estate increasing competition and pricing incumbents out of the housing market …

MEANWHILE many, it seems, have been engaged in lobbying and/or selling off Our Public Housing!!

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/2018/12/01/4927/

LOOKS LIKE the DEVELOPER LOBBY is wielding its Power & Influence to Push for more than 12-Room Boarding House Developments  

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/5423/

 

SHARE!

 

 

 

An artist impression of a boarding house at Sydney Rd, Fairlight.

An artist impression of a boarding house at Sydney Rd, Fairlight

Fears boarding house decision could ‘destroy’ northern beaches

 

The council has lost a court battle to halt the building of a boarding house — leading to fears the ruling will cause a “domino effect” along the northern beaches.

 

Northern Beaches Council unsuccessfully tried to halt the building of the 20-room property at 130 Frenchs Forest Rd, Frenchs Forest, in the Land and Environment Court arguing it was “not compatible” with the surrounding area.

Boarding houses around the Northern Beaches Hospital have been planned. Picture: Artist Impression.

 

But judges ruled on behalf of the developer — a decision mayor Michael Regan described as “disappointing”.

“I support boarding houses in the right locations,” he said. “Next to jobs, fast public transport and when they are properly planned. But right now you can tick half a dozen loose boxes and have them in residential streets.”

He described the court’s decision as concerning, adding: “It will potentially have a domino effect.”

He said he feared the ruling could jeopardise the council’s Northern Beaches Hospital masterplan, which has been submitted to the State Government.

Current boarding house applications

Frenchs Forest: 26 Frenchs Forest Rd (18 rooms); 22 Frenchs Forest Rd (20 rooms); 130 Frenchs Forest Rd West (20); 6 Gladys Ave (31); 16 Gladys Ave (103); 10 Naree Rd (39);

Dee Why: 22 Redman Rd (15); 11 May Rd (122); 727 Pittwater Rd (26).

Forestville: 12 Darley St (22).

Cromer: 17 Toronto Ave (22); 33 Carawa Rd (10);

Belrose: 14 Wyatt Ave (27)

Brookvale: 5 Fitzell Pl (24)

Narraweena: 810 Willandra Rd (28)

Fairlight: 195 Sydney Rd (75)

Allambie Heights: 139 Allambie Rd (14); 60 Binnalong Ave (36)

 

“Years have gone into the development of the masterplan,” he said. “It’s disappointing an application that is out of step with the masterplan can be approved thanks to state government rules that override local controls.”

It comes as more than 20 proposals for boarding houses across the northern beaches remain active.

They include a 75-room building in Sydney Rd, Fairlight, an 82-room facility in Gladys Ave, Frenchs Forest and 122-rooms in May Rd, Dee Why.

Gopala Maurer, president of the Northern Beaches Strategic Community Group, said the proposed boarding houses will destroy communities if allowed to go ahead.

Gopala Maurer, president of the Northern Beaches Strategic Community Group. Picture: Adam Yip / Manly Daily

 

“The intensification is just too much,” she said. “You buy a house in a suburban area because you want a suburban, quiet lifestyle. ”

She said they not only damage the lives of neighbours through traffic, parking, noise and lack of services, but also potentially damage the lives of occupants.

“It is like living in a tiny box. They are high-density often with no green space, tiny living spaces and sometimes rooms don’t even have windows. It is not a healthy environment, particularly for mental health.”

She said it was “too easy” for developers to build boarding houses in R2 residential zones which are supposed to be restricted to low density developments.

There are boarding houses planned for Dee Why. Picture: Artist Impression.

 

“All they have to do is tick a few boxes. One of the main ones is that they must be within 400 metres of a bus stop. You are never far from a bus stop on the northern beaches.”

She added that even when developments are refused by the Local Planning Panel, applicants are confident they can successfully appeal in the Land and Environment Court.

An artist impression of a boarding house at Frenchs Forest. Picture: Artist Impression.

 

Several of the current applications are the subject of appeals. They include Sydney Rd, Fairlight, May Rd, Dee Why and Fitzell Place, Brookvale. Late last year the State Government proposed amending planning guidelines to limit the size of boarding houses to 12 rooms in R2 zones. However, to date no action has been taken.

Mr Regan urged Planning Minister Anthony Roberts to make the changes immediately and also back date the policy to include current applications.

Urban Taskforce boss: boarding house stigma unfair and not helpful

 

 

Chris Johnson of the Urban Taskforce. Picture: Hollie Adams/The Australian

 

Chris Johnson, chief executive of the Urban Taskforce, said the problem with boarding houses is the name.

“When people hear boarding house they are remembering the old fashioned interpretation of a boarding house,” Mr Johnson (pictured) said.

“I think it is highly unfortunate and I think it is because the name is stigmatised.

“If they were called ‘key worker rental housing’ or something like that then I think people would probably be more reasonable.”

He criticised Northern Beaches Council for “not being open to” boarding houses, adding: “We need more affordable rental housing and boarding houses are perfect for this.

“They are now well designed and put together. They are nothing like they used to be.

“They should be part of the housing mix in the northern beaches.”

Northern Beaches Hospital time-lapse

HOW TO MAINTAIN WHAT IS LEFT OF SYDNEY: ON MARCH 23 OBLITERATE THE PROPONENTS OF BAD PLANNING

The unpopularity of deve-lopers has, it seems, finally penetrated their thick skin to come up with a piece like this …

“How to eliminate NIMBYs: let householders unite as developers” !!

What it appears to be proposing is ANTI-PLANNING, riding roughshod over people’s rights, and will result in a SHANGHAI’D SYDNEY

*”The Missing Middle” of rows of terraces, townhouses, blocks of flats (the Manor House), triplex, duplex, villas …. was introduced following the FIRB ruling allegedly cutting back on the 100% sell-off of “new homes” to foreign buyers to 50% … however that only applied to projects of 50 units plus!  (May 2017 Budget Reg.)

*Paving the way for developers to market “Medium-Density” 100% to foreign buyers …

#NSW Planning introduced legislation for “exempt and complying development” and rezoning where we live for higher density …

#THIS meant doing away with the D.A. and neighbours having no say about what goes up nextdoor!  Nor are they notified!

^  One must question the framing of a stacked question it would seem “in a recent Ipsos poll on urban density conducted for the Committee for Sydney  (a lobby group with vested interests in development) found that 47 per cent of respondents were supportive of more medium-density housing where they lived, versus only 25 per cent in favour of more high-density development nearby.” 

 

What the community are protesting about the “Missing Middle” are not the homes but there no longer is any “Planning” and the implementation by:

rezoning Sydney’s low-rise low density suburbs for higher density that can result in the demolition of whole streets,  suburbs …

– “exempt and complying development” allowing developers to build what suits them;  to date development of ugly dwellings with massive impact

-the loss of their community rights; no notification; no input; no say

-the loss of amenity (including privacy), neighbourhood character, urban bushlands;  all that they have paid for!!

-for “developers” to profit largely at the expense of the community; to sell 100% of “new homes” to foreign buyers with our Families locked out of the market

 

Image may contain: sky, tree and outdoor

CAAN Photo:  Row of townhouses under construction; block denuded; huge disruption to the street including no access to footpath; tradies trucks and cars parking out the street and surrounding streets; utter chaos and pollution for months

 

 

 

How to eliminate NIMBYs: let householders unite as developers

In Sydney, developers are about as popular as Chris Bowen at a retirees’ conference.

(CAAN:  Millionaire retiree investors; paying no tax and getting a tax rebate)

But the reality is that to get the sort of Sydney that most of us want, more of us might do better to join that happy throng – and become developers. Let me explain.

Last year, the state government released a housing policy colloquially referred to as The Missing Middle. It aims to fast-track the construction of low-rise, medium-density housing such as terraces in low-density suburbs.

The resistance to high-rise will require the growth of medium-density development, and that will require the support of residents in their own neighbourhoods.
The resistance to high-rise will require the growth of medium-density development, and that will require the support of residents in their own neighbourhoods.CREDIT:JAMES ALCOCK

*The policy seeks to provide a choice between the rampant growth in high-rise units mushrooming in centres close to transport, such as Homebush and St Leonards, and the acres of low-rise suburbia that surround them. Go to any high vantage point in Sydney, such as the Harbour Bridge or Gladesville Bridge, to see how Sydney’s future shape is rolling out.

(CAAN:  View our intro with * that explains what this means)

# Make no mistake, the current form of urban growth in Sydney, often overblown as the Manhattanisation of Sydney, is a deliberate policy of governments which have been unable to let the genie of a more moderate and dispersed form of urban renewal out of the bottle, for fear of upsetting the neighbours.

(CAAN: View our intro with # that explains what this means)

 

Image may contain: house and outdoor
CAAN Photo: Duplex that looks like a block of flats!  12 months in development with huge impact on the neighbourhood with excavation, many concrete pours, trucks blocking the street  ….
(CAAN:  All true as evidenced!)
Its release less than 12 months out from a state election probably didn’t help.
Many Sydney councils sought a moratorium on the introduction of controversial medium-density code.
Many Sydney councils sought a moratorium on the introduction of controversial medium-density code.CREDIT:WOLTER PEETERS

 

But why should we be interested in such a policy? Because it’s the form of densification that more people can live with, as well as providing a housing choice many of us might aspire to.

^A recent Ipsos poll on urban density conducted for the Committee for Sydney found that 47 per cent of respondents were supportive of more medium-density housing where they lived, versus only 25 per cent in favour of more high-density development nearby. That’s two to one voting in favour of medium-density over high-rise.

(CAAN:  View our response to this in the intro marked with ^)

The danger is that a piecemeal roll-out of the missing middle policy – where the street you live in undergoes incremental change; this site developed, the site next door not – will inflame exactly the sort of planning conflicts and neighbourhood disputes that will bring the policy down. If all politics is local, all town planning is particularly so.

The policy needs to be rolled out in an integrated way, whereby whole street blocks or precincts are master-planned for low-rise, medium-density housing and developed by residents banding together and becoming the developer.

In this way, important considerations such as overlooking, sun access and the need for extra open space can be properly planned for, with any “losers” – such as those having their block become a park – being compensated by the “winners”, who achieve redevelopment.

What better way to eliminate NIMBYism than having would-be objectors become the developer!

We have seen some limited examples of streets of residents becoming developers, most usually banding together to achieve rezoning of their properties for higher density housing near new railway stations. They then sell the rezoned land to property developers for a handsome profit.

But we need a game-changer approach and one that local councils, properly resourced, could facilitate by working with streets of willing residents. It won’t be easy but is one of the keys to implementing an important planning policy and perhaps turning on its head the notion of who is a developer and who is an objector.

Richard Pearson is a professional town planner. He is a former Deputy Secretary of the Department of Planning and was Administrator of Inner West Council

SUTHERLAND COUNCIL Calls for Shire to be Permanently Exempted from New Housing Law as residents rise up against townhouse projects!

 

 

Sutherland Shire Council has warned it may seek to ban townhouse, villa and dual occupancy developments in R2 low density zones unless the shire is permanently exempted from a new state government housing code.

Only seven councils in Sydney, including Sutherlandpermit medium density development in their low density residential zones.

The council has flagged a change if the state government imposes the new housing code, which makes medium density housing complying development.

Residents are protesting across the Shire … notably in Sutherland, Jannali, Sylvania and Carringbah …. Find the link to the Petition below!

 

 

FEBRUARY 27 2019

Council calls for shire to be permanently exempted from new housing law as residents rise up against townhouse projects

Sutherland Shire Council has warned it may seek to ban townhouse, villa and dual occupancy developments in R2 low density zones unless the shire is permanently exempted from a new state government housing code.

 

Only seven councils in Sydney, including Sutherland, permit medium density development in their low density residential zones.

The council has flagged a change if the state government imposes the new housing code, which makes medium density housing complying development.

 

Under the code, if developers adhere to basic guidelines, they don’t have to go through the normal development application process and neighbours are not notified.

 

Following widespread protests, most Sydney councils were given a 12-month exemption from the code, which expires on July 1, 2019.

 

Sutherland Shire Council wrote last year to Planning Minister Anthony Roberts and shire MPs, seeking a permanent exemption.

 

This month’s council meeting was told there had been no reply from the state government.

 

The council will further lobby Mr Roberts while preparing contingency measures, such as a possible ban in R2 zones, if the request is not granted.

 

That change could be included in the next local environmental plan (LEP), which is due to be introduced in 2021, and requires state government approval.

 

The council will present figures to Mr Roberts showing the shire will meet, and may exceed, the building target set by the government.

 

Over the last three and a half years, 2003 low rise medium density dwellings have been approved, with a further 461 dwellings still to be determined.

 

The South District plan set a five-year completions target of 5200 dwellings of all types to 2020/21.

 

The council has approved 6261 new homes, with a further 1466 pending.

 

Not all approvals will be converted into new dwellings, particularly with the housing downturn.

 

The council’s concern about medium density development coincides with protests in several suburbs, including two on the weekend.

 

About 90 people attended a meeting in Kurrajong Street, Sutherland, where two developments in an R2 zone are strongly opposed.

 

The meeting was also designed to draw attention to development concerns across the shire.

 

*Residents were asked to sign an online petition: https://bit.ly/2U9HlCP 

(Google search for the Change.org petition)

 

At Jannali, residents are fighting a development application for 18 townhouses on two blocks in an R2 zone, with one vehicle access point from a cul-de-sac.

 

Sylvania residents are trying to stop a DA for two blocks at 51-53 Melrose Avenue, providing for 2 homes, comprising nine four-bedroom townhouses and three three-bedroom villas.

 

Each villa has an attic, designed as a living area, which residents claim is designed to evade the 60/40 rule, which confines double storey to the front 60 per cent of a property.  Residents say, if the development proceeds, the new homes will all effectively be two storeys and look over the backyards of about a dozen existing houses.

 

Another contentious townhouse DA is in Gannons Road, Caringbah, where, in September 2018, the Sutherland Shire Local Planning Panel gave the developer four months to come up with “a more skillful design” to minimise adverse impacts on adjoining properties.

The proposed complex of seven townhouses would look into the backyards of many existing properties, and was described by Cr Carol Provan as “the worst case of medium density overdevelopment I have seen” during 18 years on the council.

.

 

 

SOURCE:  https://www.theleader.com.au/story/5926683/housing-ban-threat/?cs=1507

 

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