NSW COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES BALK AT GOVT DECISION TO STRIP COUNCILS OF PLANNING APPROVAL POWERS … IHAPS

 

 

NSW COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES BALK AT GOVT DECISION TO STRIP COUNCILS OF PLANNING APPROVAL POWERS … IHAPS

June 1 2017

After Fairfax Media reported that a proposal to make IHAPs mandatory would be taken to cabinet, council representatives reacted strongly.

Keith Rhoades, the president of Local Government NSW said he was concerned making planning panels mandatory had the potential to “reduce the accountability and transparency of planning decisions.”

“Councils are accountable to the community where [local planning panels] are not,” Cr Rhoades said. “There is no accountability like the ballot box.”

JUNE 1 2017

NSW Government balks at decision to strip councils of approval powers

Jacob Saulwick Sean Nicholls

Some NSW or Sydney councils may retain the ability to grant or block development applications, after the state government balked at an immediate decision to hand those powers to independent panels.

Fairfax Media reported this week planning minister Anthony Roberts would seek cabinet approval on Thursday for a proposal to require all councils to set up and use panels to decide on development applications.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian, Treasurer Dominic Perrottet and Minister for Planning and Housing Anthony Roberts unveiled a …

But the government instead said on Thursday it would canvass opinions on the so-called Independent Housing and Assessment Panels (IHAPS).

“We are going to be consulting on this,” the Premier, Gladys Berejiklian, said.

“Our intention is much greater use of IHAPS,” she said.

“But we also want to consult before we issue those new regulations to make sure communities feel that they are part of the decision-making process.”

The theory behind using independent panels is that while elected councillors are able to determine the shape of plans for an area through the development of a Local Environment Plan, the implementation and enforcement of that plan is left to independent experts.

The former planning minister, Rob Stokes, announced in January an intention to introduce regulation allowing the government to require a council to use a panel to decide planning applications.

But Mr Stokes, leery of another fight with local government, stopped short of mandating the use of IHAPS.

After Fairfax Media reported that a proposal to make IHAPs mandatory would be taken to cabinet, council representatives reacted strongly.

Keith Rhoades, the president of Local Government NSW said he was concerned making planning panels mandatory had the potential to “reduce the accountability and transparency of planning decisions.”

“Councils are accountable to the community where [local planning panels] are not,” Cr Rhoades said. “There is no accountability like the ballot box.”

Mr Roberts said on Thursday he would not comment on cabinet deliberations but was “incredibly happy with the outcome in respect to IHAPs.”

But he could not say what the government would do about them. “We firmly believe IHAPS play an important role and will play an important role as we move forward in developing solutions with respect to hosing affordability,” he said.

The Minister said he would, however, also give more powers to councillors from specific wards to develop plans for their neighbourhood.

“We will be empowering ward councillors to actually create and develop the LEPs rather than the council as a whole,” he said.

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Murray-Darling Basin Plan: $8 billion spent and still the Coorong wetland is dying

 

Murray-Darling Basin Plan: $8 billion spent and still the Coorong wetland is dying

Updated:  Saturday 28 April 2018

The Murray-Darling Basin Plan is six years in and Australian taxpayers have spent $8 billion on it so far — yet the internationally significant ecosystem at the end of the basin, the Coorong, is dying.

The south lagoon of the Coorong lies at the very end of the Murray-Darling Basin in South Australia.

It’s salt water, but not as we know it — the south lagoon can be up to three times as salty as the sea.

Ecologist David Paton says it explains just how unique this place is: the Coorong gets gradually more salty as it runs more than 100 kilometres from the north lagoon down to the south, and as that happens the biodiversity changes too.

“As you come down that gradient the biodiversity changes from being lots of little fishes at the top end, and when you get to the south lagoon there’s just one fish that’s really salt tolerant,” Mr Paton said.

“Some people would know it as whitebait, but it’s hardyhead.

There’s one prominent invertebrate, it’s a little chironomid, and there’s one key aquatic plant, a plant called Ruppia tuberosa.”

One fish, one insect and one plant doesn’t sound like a rich habitat, but Mr Paton says it is quite the contrary — this bare-bones foundation can support a huge number of birds.

“Salinity has been its natural state for the last few hundred years, and the biota that’s in it clearly likes living in high salinity,” he said.

“Lots of people say high salinity usually reduces productivity, but the organisms that form this south lagoon system are highly productive, so you only need a few of them.”

So many birds come here to feed and nest that the Coorong has been declared a Ramsar-listed wetland.

The Ramsar Convention is an agreement to protect wetlands of international importance, and signatory countries promise to look after any wetlands within their borders which make it onto the list.

There are 16 Ramsar-listed wetlands in the Murray-Darling Basin, but of all of them, the Coorong is supposed to have the greatest wealth of waterbirds.

That includes local species and the all-important migratory shorebirds — birds which fly to the Coorong every year, like the curlew sandpiper.

It’s a critically endangered species which travels from Siberia to the Coorong, where it spends the Australian summer fattening up before it takes flight again.

The Coorong also has the only permanent breeding ground for pelicans in South Australia, key habitats for other bird species, fish, and even the odd emu wanders down to the shore.

The early warning system

The Coorong isn’t just a pretty place with nice birds — it can tell us a lot about what’s going on with the health of the basin.

Rivers die from the mouth up, so if the very end of the Murray-Darling Basin system is struggling, that’s not a good sign for what’s happening up river.

Mr Paton has been collecting bird data here for the past 30 years, but in the last two years, during the Basin Plan, he says the numbers of the shorebird species which make this place so special have hit a record low.

The first year was bad — but what really worried Mr Paton was that in the following year, the birds couldn’t bounce back.

“It’s the shorebirds in particular which have been really low,” he says.

“If this was a healthy system, we would be typically getting 30-50,000 red-necked stints, 20-30,000 sharp tailed sandpipers, and curlew sandpipers, even under normal circumstances, we expect 5-10,000 — that’s just three species.

“And then there’s a suite of other things — banded stilts, black-winged stilts, which are an Australian species.

“Even in the middle of the millennium drought there was nearly 250,000 banded stilts in the south lagoon of the Coorong alone.”

So how many shorebirds has he seen in the Coorong in the past two years?

“I think we’ve seen 10-20,000 total in the Coorong in the last couple of years, and that’s across all species, not just the few common ones,” Mr Paton said.

Last summer’s bird count only registered 968 curlew sandpipers, when they should have numbered between 5,000 and 10,000, he explained.

‘This country does not care about nature’

A Background Briefing investigation has come across an internal South Australian Government document — a report on the Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) — which suggests they are preparing to lose up to 80 per cent of key species in the Coorong.

Breaching these limits means making an embarrassing confession to the Ramsar Wetland Convention and to the world.

This internal technical report shows the State Government knows the Coorong’s ecology is in real trouble, and on paper it’s already moving to re-frame the situation.

The report suggests re-defining the Limits of Acceptable Change for the Coorong, and setting them very low — at “greater than or equal to 80 per cent decline”.

It even gets into acceptable numbers of dead birds.

So if we look at just one species, the critically endangered curlew sandpiper, it suggests 4,092 birds could be lost from the south lagoon alone and on paper that would be acceptable.

Mr Paton says this would be sanctioning system collapse.

“We used to have tens of thousands of shorebirds here, you’d see them resting at times, the food base was much stronger,” he said.

“And we are just quietly kidding ourselves that we actually care about nature — this country does not care about nature.”

The South Australian Government has told Background Briefing that this report is not their official policy; it’s more like advice, and it will finalise its new policy sometime this year.

An environment spokesperson said since 2015, the waterbird LACs have had further refinements, including further statistical analysis.

They said the Government’s policy will come from the updated Ecological Character Description, expected to be completed by mid-2018.

Where has all the water gone?

Like other parts of the basin, the Coorong has been in slow decline since the 1980s when basin agriculture upstream became increasingly water-intensive.

The Basin Plan was supposed to rescue a basin in crisis, and ensure there was enough water to maintain a healthy environment and river system.

Despite the past six years of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan and a spend totalling $8 billion so far, there’s just not enough water coming down the river for the Coorong.

Not enough water means the lagoons of the Coorong can’t function as they normally do.

But there’s also a second, big problem.

In the last three or four years, the Coorong has had massive algal blooms.

Algae starving birds to death

The algae blooms over summer on the water, and it catches on the aquatic plant Ruppia tuberosa that lives in the salty south lagoon and rips it out.

No Ruppia means no food for the birds.

But it doesn’t stop there; the algae has bloomed and died, and now it cakes the shoreline.

It stinks, and it forms a bleached white carpet over the sand.

Remember that one insect that lives here, the coronomid?

It hatches out of the sand, but if there’s a layer of algae, very few of the insects can get through.

Most just die in place after hatching.

So the birds have no Ruppia tuberosa to eat and also no coronomid to eat — knocking out two of the three major pillars which support this ecosystem.

“Little sandpipers, red-necked stints and so on, their numbers have been dropping, but they’re spending up to 90 per cent of their daytime foraging when they’re here,” Mr Paton said.

“Any bird that spends 90 per cent of its time foraging in January two months before it’s due to fatten is struggling.

“It doesn’t have enough food.”

The result is what you’d expect: after flying to the Coorong sometimes from the other side of the world, the birds starve to death here.

You won’t see them on the shoreline, because the foxes eat the carcasses.

But Mr Paton says he realised the truth when he went out onto the little islands of the Coorong where there are no foxes.

“You find these dead emaciated shorebirds sitting in amongst the rocks where they’ve died, and sometimes you’ll find 20 or 30,” he said.

“Some of them are now listed as critically endangered.”

Warning: system crash imminent

The south lagoon of the Coorong is normally pretty salty.

The South Australian Government has built a drain there, which releases water coming off agricultural land.

This water is less salty than the Coorong, so it freshens the south lagoon — and because it’s come from farmland, it has a lot of nutrients in it.

“Everyone’s against the high salinities, so they say, ‘Oh, we’ve got a high salinity problem, we can solve that by putting water in through the south-east in the end of this highly saline lagoon which freshens that end’,” Mr Paton said.

“Two things which favour algal blooms: lowering the salinity and adding nutrients, so the whole of the south lagoon now has nutrients in it.”

This drain is about to expand significantly under a South Australian Government project called the South East Flows Restoration Project, but very soon it could be officially counted under the Murray-Darling Basin Plan.

There’s a key vote due to come before the Senate when it sits in May.

At stake is whether Australia recovers any more water for the environment under the Basin Plan.

The states say the basin’s river systems don’t need any more water returned to them.

They say they can build engineering structures which will achieve “equivalent environmental outcomes”.

The project above that’s adding nutrients to the water? That’s one of those engineering structures.

The South East Flows Restoration Project website says to keep the salty south lagoon healthy there has to be between 60 and 100 grams of salt per litre in the water.

But according to documents released to the Senate, the South East Flows Restoration Project will dump agricultural water in the Coorong when salinity is as low as 60 grams per litre.

That level is the very bottom of what even the South Australian Government itself says is healthy.

So by kicking in at 60 grams per litre, the drain will take the lagoon out of a healthy range.

Mr Paton says that will cause the whole system to crash.

“Putting in the volumes that they want to put in is going to cause environmental damage to this system,” he said.

It’s going to lower the salinity — it already has in places, so, nutrients and salinity are going to favour algae.

“The Coorong is already responding negatively to what’s coming in and it’s going to be a lot worse.”

Background Briefing asked Mr Paton if the Coorong should be blacklisted by the international community of Ramsar if the South East Flows Restoration Project goes ahead.

He didn’t hesitate.

“Absolutely, it should probably have been blacklisted some time ago, because we were failing to meet our obligations under international agreements,” he says.

Background Briefing has a special two-part investigation into the Murray Darling Basin beginning on April 26.

 

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OWNERSHIP OF OTHER RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY … ABS

 

30 Ranch Ave, Glenbrook

 

OWNERSHIP OF OTHER RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY … ABS

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4130.0~2015-16~Main%20Features~Ownership%20of%20Other%20Residential%20Property~10000

Many Australians own a residential property other than the one they currently reside in. In 2015–16 there were 1.78 million households that owned residential property other than their usual residence. Such properties include those that are being rented out as residential investment properties and those used for other purposes, such as holiday homes.

Most households (72%) who owned other residential property owned a single property. Around one in twenty households (5%) who owned other property owned four or more properties.

Owner occupiers were more likely to own additional residential property, with around 1.39 million owner households owning other residential property. This compares to 342,000 households who own other residential property but are renting their usual residence.

Graph Image for Graph 1 Ownership of other residential property, EDHI (a) quintile, 2015-16

Graph Image for Graph 1 Ownership of other residential property, EDHI (a) quintile, 2015-16

Footnote(s): (a) Equivalised Disposable Household Income. See Explanatory Notes for more information

Source(s): Survey of Income and Housing

 

Almost four in ten households who owned another residential property, excluding their current dwelling (38%) belonged to the highest quintile of equivalised disposable household income, while just over one in 10 of those households (11%) were in the lowest quintile of equivalised disposable household income.

Considering the value of other residential property, for 81% of households that owned this type of asset, the worth of these was under $1 million, whereas 6% of households who owned other residential property had in excess of $2 million worth of these assets.

For more data regarding ownership of other residential property see data cube 11, available to download from the ‘Downloads’ tab of this product.
This page last updated 12 October 2017

 

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NEGATIVE GEARING LIES RESURFACE

 

 

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NEGATIVE GEARING LIES RESURFACE

KEY POINTS:

-Labor argues that 70 per cent of the value of benefits of negative gearing went to the wealthiest 10 per cent

-Taxable income is the wrong measure to use as it is the income that is left over after various deductions like negative gearing

-October 2017 the ABS released its Housing Occupancy and Costs, 2015-16, which revealed that it is primarily higher income earners engaged in negative gearing

So much for the claim that “Labor’s policy to slash the widely used practice would hit more lower-income earners with only one investment property”.

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Negative gearing lies resurface

By Unconventional Economist in Australian Property

April 27, 2018
By Leith van Onselen

Treasury analysis of Australian Taxation Office (ATO) data from 2015-16 suggests that people with taxable incomes of less than $80,000 a year would be hardest hit by Labor’s proposed negative gearing reforms. From The Australian:

Almost two-thirds of all investors who negatively geared property were on taxable incomes of less than $80,000 a year, according to new tax office data that suggests Labor’s policy to slash the widely used practice would hit more lower-income earners with only one investment property…

The statistics also included figures on the number and occupations of people affected by Labor’s $20bn plan to scrap negative gearing on new purchases of existing properties, showing 62 per cent were on taxable incomes of under $80,000 a year.

*Labor has rejected claims that lower income earners would be hit by scrapping negative gearing, arguing that 70 per cent of the value of benefits from the practice went to the wealthiest 10 per cent. “Despite spurious claims being made about the benefits of negative gearing being overwhelmingly claimed by nurses and policemen, the evidence from analysis by the Grattan Institute shows that in fact it is finance managers and anaesthetists that benefit from these investment subsidies,” Labor’s policy document says.

*Taxable income is the wrong measure to use at it is the income that is left over after various deductions like negative gearing.

In October, the ABS has released its Housing Occupancy and Costs, 2015-16, which reveals that it is not ordinary “mums and dads” that are primarily engaged in negative gearing, but rather higher income earners [my emphasis]:

Many Australians own a residential property other than the one they currently reside in. In 2015–16 there were 1.78 million households that owned residential property other than their usual residence. Such properties include those that are being rented out as residential investment properties and those used for other purposes, such as holiday homes.

Most households (72%) who owned other residential property owned a single property. Around one in twenty households (5%) who owned other property owned four or more properties.

Owner occupiers were more likely to own additional residential property, with around 1.39 million owner households owning other residential property. This compares to 342,000 households who own other residential property but are renting their usual residence.

View:

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4130.0~2015-16~Main%20Features~Ownership%20of%20Other%20Residential%20Property~10000

Almost four in ten households who owned another residential property, excluding their current dwelling (38%) belonged to the highest quintile of equivalised disposable household income, while just over one in 10 of those households (11%) were in the lowest quintile of equivalised disposable household income.

*According to the ABS, the top 40% of households accounted for 61.8% of all housing investors in 2015-16, comprising 38.4% in the highest income quintile and 23.4% in the fourth income quintile.

So much for the claim that “Labor’s policy to slash the widely used practice would hit more lower-income earners with only one investment property”.

unconventionaleconomist@hotmail.com

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NSW GOVERNMENT PRIVATISING THE PROFITS AND SOCIALISING THE COSTS OF MASS IMMIGRATION

 

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NSW GOVT PRIVATISING THE PROFITS AND SOCIALISING THE COSTS OF MASS IMMIGRATION

OBVIOUSLY toll road operators, retailers, banks and property developers enjoy the easy growth in profits and revenue that come from ever expanding immigration

MEANWHILE Sydneysiders suffer from the increased competition and reduced bargaining power at work …

-rising housing costs
-rising infrastructure costs
-schools, hospitals, trains and buses are all full-up
-longer and more expensive commutes

RALLY! DO SOMETHIN’ You’re Somebody write to your local MPs, candidates

Privatising the profits and socialising the costs of mass immigration
https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2018/04/privatising-profits-socialising-costs-mass-immigration/

By Unconventional Economist in Australian Economy
April 30, 2018
By Leith van Onselen

While residents of Sydney and Melbourne are suffering from crush-loaded roads, trains, schools, hospitals, and prisons, as well as hideously expensive housing, toll road company Transurban is the front-runner to buy Sydney’s WestConnex toll road, which means it will own the bulk of Sydney’s toll roads. From The SMH:

…one of the bidders for the [WestConnex] motorway – Transurban – already owns the concessions for the bulk of the city’s toll roads. What does it mean to have so many of our motorways in the hands of one company? What might it mean to have more?..

Within the last decade, Transurban’s share price has almost doubled, giving it a market value of more than $25 billion. Of the 99 kilometres of toll roads in Sydney, 95 kilometres are either majority or half-owned by Transurban…

People wary of Transurban’s rise refer to the way in which the company has appeared able to get governments to do what it wants… “They’ve been able to invest so that they’re in a monopoly position for the future,” Tony Harris, a former auditor-general, says of Transurban…

“There aren’t that many road projects in Sydney,” says one infrastructure advisor. “If Transurban wins WestConnex, they have effectively locked up the east coast tollway market.”

In February, Transurban reported a massive lift in profits as Australia’s mass immigration ‘Big Australia’ policy continues to feed customers into Sydney and Melbourne:

The tollroad company is benefiting from higher revenues in its road development and tolling businesses…

Net profits for the six months to June rose 280 per cent from $88 million a year earlier…

Transurban makes its highest profit margins in Melbourne, where margins run at 88.5 per cent, and Sydney, where margins run at 81.2 per cent.

Group toll revenues rose 9.6 per cent to $1.13 billion, while construction revenues jumped 69 per cent to $462 million.

Toll revenue increases were driven by both traffic growth and higher toll fares…

This folks is Australia’s population ponzi economy in action. It’s a model of growth where corporate Australia privatises the gains from mass immigration and socialises the costs on everyone else.

Former treasury secretary turned NAB chairman, Ken Henry, explained this model in a speech last year:

Research NAB carried out earlier in the year showed that among our customers there’s not wholesale support for a larger Australia. For many, the prospect of a higher Australian population means more stress in the ability to buy a house, to live where you want to live, to get to work with a reasonable commute time. And many in the community are also concerned about our ability, as a nation, to maintain norms of Australian social and economic inclusion, and to continue to provide access to high quality services in areas such as healthcare and education…

But what is the business perspective? The same NAB research showed that most of our business customers would strongly prefer a larger population, which supports better business growth.

With Australia’s two biggest cities desperately trying to build infrastructure to keep pace with the population ponzi, private companies like Transurban are facing further strong profit growth, paid for by ordinary motorists like you and me.

For example, the Victorian Government’s $6.7 billion West Gate Tunnel Project will see Transurban contribute $4.4 billion towards the cost, but in exchange motorists will have to pay additional tolls on CityLink until 2045 estimated at $15 billion. It’s a sweet deal for Transurban, but a dud deal for Melbourne motorists.

In a similar vein, Sydney’s $17 billion WestConnex project will see existing free public roads like the state-owned M4 (that have already been paid off) being tolled to help fund the project. Toll are contracted to rise by 4% per year for the 43 years, thus raising costs for residents.

Clearly, private businesses like toll road operators, retailers, banks and property developers get to enjoy the easy growth in revenue and profits that come from an ever expanding customer base, whereas households suffer from the increased competition and reduced bargaining power at work, rising housing costs, rising infrastructure costs, and longer and more expensive commutes.

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SYDNEY’S RENTAL MARKET WORST IN THE COUNTRY … HOMELESSNESS DOUBLES IN PARRAMATTA

 

Siale Hausia with her three kids Vaohoi, 8 (front), Ta’a, 11 (left) and Lotu, 13 (back).

SYDNEY’S RENTAL MARKET WORST IN THE COUNTRY … HOMELESSNESS DOUBLES IN PARRAMATTA

IT appears this predicament for Tenants is a consequence of the Game of Mates! Since 2011 NSW LNP have sold off Public Housing Estates!

WITH some 200,000 people on the Public Housing waiting list!

Supply increase makes no impact on Sydney’s rental market as tenants struggle to pay

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-30/supply-increase-in-sydney-rental-market/9709018

By Kathleen Calderwood

Sydney’s rental market is tough

PHOTO: The Sydney rental market is still unaffordable for people on lower incomes (ABC News )

RELATED STORY: Australian property ‘severely unaffordable’ by global standards

RELATED STORY: The truth about living in Sydney: Everyone has an escape plan

RELATED STORY: Rental market crisis ‘failing many Australians’

A 28 per cent increase in supply across Sydney’s rental market has failed to push down prices, with less than 1 per cent of properties in Sydney’s market considered “affordable”, a survey of rental properties has revealed.

The Anglicare Rental Affordability Snapshot surveys all the private rentals available in Australia over a weekend in March.

This year Sydney ranked the worst of all major cities with only 57 out of the more than 18,000 private rental properties canvassed across Sydney and Illawarra — or less than 1 per cent — deemed affordable for people on income support payments.

The national rate was 6 per cent.

None of the private rental properties in the Sydney area were suitable for single people on Newstart or Youth Allowance.

“There were only half a dozen available out of that 18,000 for families that were a couple with two children on Newstart,” Anglicare’s head of research and advocacy Susan King said.

“We found that for single parents on a parenting payment there was nothing available, for a single parent on Newstart with one child it was the same.”

Rental properties are considered “affordable” if they cost up to 30 per cent of a person’s income.

Western Sydney homelessness growing

Western Sydney mother of three Siale Hausia said the stress of paying rent left her constantly on edge.

In 2016 she was a stay-at-home mother when her then-husband lost his job.

Without a stable income, their $550-a-week rent became too much.

The financial pressure took a toll on their marriage, and Ms Hausia and her children ended up staying with a cousin in her one bedroom home.

Eventually, they ended up in a refuge.

“I didn’t have any choice, I had to go to community centres to ask for help,” Ms Hausia said.

“The only option I had was a refuge because there’s no way they give a single mother of three kids living on Centrelink a place, there’s no way.”

Siale Hausia with her three kids Vaohoi, 8 (front), Ta’a, 11 (left) and Lotu, 13 (back).

PHOTO: Siale Hausia ended up in a refuge with her three kids Vaohoi, 8 (front) Ta’a, 11 (left) and Lotu, 13 (back). (ABC News: Kathleen Calderwood)

The latest census data on homelessness shows a startling increase in Sydney’s west.

Between 2011 and 2016 the number of homeless people in the Parramatta area more than doubled; the south-western suburbs went from 2,100 to 3,071 homeless people and homelessness in the inner-south-western suburbs grew by more than 50 per cent.

Ms Hausia said it took five or six months to find somewhere suitable to live. She now works as a disability support worker.

But she still worries about not being able to pay the rent.

“You’re living on the edge because you don’t know what’s going to happen next,” she said.

“They might cut your Centrelink, and then you can’t afford the rent and you have to leave, or they put up the rent and you can’t afford it.

“I never say no to work, I work hard to not go back to refuge and not go back to being homeless. I don’t want my kids to go through that ever again.”

More public housing desperately needed: Anglicare
Ms King said an increase in supply has not helped low income earners, and there needs to be an increase in public housing.

“Even though there are 28 per cent more listings available it hasn’t translated to increased affordability,” she said.

“There’s a huge crisis in terms of public housing and the lack of public housing in NSW — there’s very long waiting lists, you’ve got a lot of people queueing up.

“Until those issues are resolved I think the private rental market is still going to be very, very tight for most people.”

Government defends housing policies

The NSW Government has defended its public housing policies and pointed to its long-term plans to increase the number of affordable rental homes.

Finding a home is tough going

PHOTO: Finding an affordable home is hard work in Sydney (ABC News: Giulio Saggin)

A statement from the Department of Family and Community Services said the Government was undertaking the biggest social housing building program in the country to deliver 23,000 social and 500 affordable homes by 2026.

“The program includes five major sites for development in Sydney and Greater Sydney including the Ivanhoe Estate,” the statement said.

“The sale of ageing social housing in Millers Point is financing the construction of social housing across the wider Sydney area, including Bankstown, Canterbury, Liverpool and Fairfield areas and the Sutherland and Wollongong areas.

“As of March 2018, a total of 872 units have been completed and 310 units are currently under construction as a result of the Millers Point sales.

“In total, more than 1,500 new homes will be provided for some of the most vulnerable people in New South Wales as a result of the Millers Point sale, including many on the social housing waiting list.”

However, Opposition housing spokeswoman Tania Mihailuk said the data showed the Government’s housing strategy was failing.

“The latest data cast doubt on the Premier’s assertion that adding new housing supply improves affordability,” she said.

“If you don’t actually mandate affordable housing targets when you are increasing supply, you just end up with more unaffordable properties.”

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THE GAME OF MATES: AUSTRALIA’S PROPERTY INDUSTRY IS RACKED WITH POLITICAL FAVOURITISM

 

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THE GAME OF MATES: AUSTRALIA’S PROPERTY INDUSTRY IS RACKED WITH POLITICAL FAVOURITISM

THIS is a thorough report however, what escaped mention is that of the 100% sell off of Australian “new homes” to wealthy foreign buyers … perhaps that is the last nail in the coffin?

View for CAAN report on the 53 developer groups that met with the NSW Planning Minister from January to September 2017:

https://www.facebook.com/744190798994541/photos/a.761955963884691.1073741833.744190798994541/1715949555151989/?type=3

Australia’s Property Industry is Racked with Political Favouritism

by Andrew Heaton September 19th, 2017

If you wanted to strike it rich in property, one way would be to buy land on the outskirts of metropolitan areas, wait for it to be rezoned into residential use, and reap windfall gains by either selling to a developer or building on it yourself.

Ordinary mum and dad investors, however, stand little or no chance of doing this.

In a 2015 study, University of Queensland economists Cameron Murray and Paul Frijters looked at six selected areas in which decision making about rezoning was taken from local councils and assumed by the state’s Urban Land Development Authority.

The change in decision making authority took place over a six-year period spanning 2007 to 2012 under a program designed to boost housing supply and increase the speed and scale of residential development within those areas.

Murray and Frijters then used micro-level data from multiple sources to compare the relationship characteristics both inside and outside the ULDA areas and to compare outcomes for landowners who were considered to be well connected with those experienced by less well connected owners.

Their findings were revealing. ‘Corporate’ owners (i.e. property development companies) owned 75.3 per cent of the land which was rezoned but just 12.5 per cent of the land nearby outside of the rezoned areas.

Members of the Property Council of Australia and the Urban Development Institute of Australia owned almost 40 per cent and 23.5 per cent of the land within the rezoned areas respectively but owned just over one per cent of the land in the nearby surrounds.

Political donors owned 40 per cent of the land inside the rezoned areas but just 1.5 per cent of the land outside.

Hiring a professional lobbyist increased your chances of having your land rezoned by 37 per cent. Being part of a ‘connected’ network did likewise by 25 per cent. Of the $710 million worth of gains which Murray and Frijters calculated were derived from the uplift in values during these rezoning periods, around $410 million was captured by ‘connected’ landowners.

Well connected parties did not simply own land in the right areas. When they looked at areas which had been rezoned, Murray and Frijters found some strange shapes which could not be explained by rational decision making.

The above study underscored an ugly truth about how political decision making in Australia is influenced not just by public interest considerations but also the vested interests of powerful stakeholders. In the property sector, this includes the development industry itself but extends to other powerful groups such as existing home owners and residential property investors.

Less powerful groups such as renters, other would-be home owners and public housing tenants get a raw deal – as can broader public interest considerations. This extends beyond rezoning to policy areas which impact housing and rental affordability as well as public housing provision.

According to Murray and Frijters, this phenomenon affects more than just the property sector. In their recent book Game of Mates, the two economists argue that the idea of favouritism extends across many areas of the broader economy.

Nicolas Gruen, chief executive officer of economic consultancy and public policy advisory Lateral Economics, divides stakeholders into four categories: the development industry, existing property owners, those who would like to buy a home (renters or those living with parents) and the broader aesthetics of the built environment. The latter groups he said, often get a raw deal compared with the former.

As well as their lack of political influence, Gruen says part of the challenge for the latter groups arises from their interests being impacted not by single individual decisions but rather by the cumulative effect of a large number of individual decisions.

Interests of would-be home owners in terms of housing affordability, for example, are impacted not by an individual decision to approve or block any one development but rather by the overall impact of a large number of decisions which cumulatively effect available housing supply. As a result, he said, it becomes difficult for the public interest to inject itself into decision making mechanisms regarding individual projects notwithstanding the fact that these decisions will deliver an overall cumulative impact.

A particular area which Gruen says has not been well served is the aesthetic interest. Whereas many public buildings constructed from around the 1890s through to the 1920s and 30s had good character and were nice to look at, much of the new stock nowadays is bland. As a result, he says, cities such as Sydney and Melbourne in Australia and Paris overseas were beautiful places prior to the 1950s but are witnessing a considerable volume of new stock which is less aesthetically pleasing.

“The interests of both developers and locals are well represented and powerfully represented,” Gruen said.

“Local residents have been very successful at slowing densification and local development. That’s in their interests as they judge it but not in the interests of outsiders who might want to live in that area because it pushes up house prices. That represents a very large problem for us.

“Developers interests are well represented because there is a lot of money at stake and they make a large windfall from decisions about property – most particularly rezoning. That goes into all kinds of activities – legal and legitimate or otherwise and borderline.

“But through all that, the interests of the community get short shrift.”

According to Murray, the most affected area is land rezoning. Indeed, he talks of an industry which can be divided into two sides.

First, he says there is the ‘construction’ side of the industry which builds homes adds to housing supply.

Second, he talks of a ‘property development’ side. In this side of the industry, Murray says developers make large amounts of money by buying up agricultural or industrial land and then working their connections to have the land rezoned for residential use. This, he says, sees the value of land holdings multiply by several times and is where much of the money is made.

Once land has been rezoned, Murray says developers further lobby to have taxpayers fork out billions of dollars to put in roads, rail lines and utilities – a process which further inflates the value of developer holdings yet is paid for by taxpayers.

He talks of an industry mired in potentially illegal corruption but more so ‘grey’ corruption. This, he says, is where developers use legal means (such as employing lobbyists) to gain a decision-making outcome which is more favourable to them than would be the case with an ordinary outcome in which decisions were influenced solely by public interest.

“A lot of the time, it’s about buying land such as a farm or an industrial building, paying the value of the land for that use and then lobbying either the council or the state government to change what you can do on that land to then be able to build, for example, a high-rise apartment building on that industrial site,” Murray said.

“What you are getting is a different property right than what you paid for. You paid the seller the right to run an industrial warehouse. What you are getting when you make that rezoning application, is that you are surrendering one property right and getting one which is worth a whole lot more to build a high-rise building or whatever you propose. You paid the previous seller for one right at one price and you make an application and the government grants it on behalf of everybody – the right to use it for something which is worth a whole lot more.

“This is the whole industry. This is how the big developers make money.”

A means by which this happens, Murray said, involves a revolving door in terms of employment between the public sector and private sector developers. He says many employed in state or local government planning roles have either previously worked for private developers or have gone on to do so after leaving public office – a process he says enables implicit favours given to private developers whilst the person was in public office to be repaid.

Professor Peter Phibbs, a planner and social economist at Sydney University, says the degree of vested interest influence over land rezoning was borne out by the Murray and Frijters.

Phibbs agrees about the revolving door. In New South Wales, he says, the number of those who go from working within the planning department or from being on planning panels to subsequently working for private sector developers is concerning. He is aware of one case where a person was serving on a planning panel one month and the following month after leaving was engaged as a consultant to a developer who was trying to get a decision through that panel. Whilst emphasising that he was not suggesting wrongdoing, Phibbs says such situations reinforce negative perceptions amongst the public.

“If you look at New South Wales, a number of people have rolled out of the Department of Planning and ended up working for private companies and developers,” Phibbs said. “I don’t think that’s a great look.

“I think if you are a member of the public and one month you go there and a person is sitting on a panel and next month they are arguing the case for the developer for a planning proposal, it’s not a good look.”

At a broader level, Phibbs says many feel there is an imbalance of access to decision makers. Such fears are not unfounded. A scan of appointments in the diary of NSW Planning Minister Anthony Roberts over three months from April to June this year, for example, shows that around half of his meetings about policy which were not with other ministers or MPs were in fact with private companies or industry lobby groups. Whilst again there is no suggestion of wrongdoing, this does suggest that influential stakeholders enjoy access to ministers at a level beyond that enjoyed by ordinary members of the public.

Beyond land rezoning and infrastructure, favouritism also impacts decisions housing and rental affordability decisions.

Assuming you hold income levels and monetary policy settings constant, there are effectively two ways in which housing can be made more affordable.

First, you could encourage greater volumes of new housing at lower pricing points. This could be achieved by opening up new greenfield areas, delivering more housing in regional cities or by encouraging units and flats rather than detached houses.

Beyond that, housing can only be made more affordable by making houses cheaper – reducing the value of property or at least limiting the pace at which it is increasing. This might be welcomed by the 30.9 per cent of Australians whom the ABS says currently rent their homes or by others who want to enter the market but would be opposed by two more powerful groups.

First, the cashed-up development lobby has no interest in housing being cheaper as this would mean their stock would sell for less. Moreover, there are existing home owners for whom reduced home values would lead to a lower base of net wealth. Comprising almost two-thirds of all Australians, this voter cohort outnumbers renters and those wanting to enter the market by more than two to one. Compared with their renting counterparts, owners are also typically wealthier and more politically active.

The upshot, Murray says, is that politicians might want to make housing more affordable but will not do anything to make housing cheaper.

In this environment, Phibbs says, politicians make noises about affordability but have done little other than first-home-buyer handouts – a phenomenon he says will change as renters grow in number and existing home owners increasingly see their children locked out of the market.

In rental affordability, as well, Murray points out that the needs of tenants for affordable (and thus cheaper) rents butts up against those of the wealthier and more politically active cohort of investors who want to maximise the return they derive from their investment.

Not only is the power of existing home owners and investors a factor in politicians not wanting to make housing cheaper, it is also a direct factor in decisions regarding tax concessions and planning.

On tax concessions, the Coalition at least does not wish to remove these for fear of backlash among a significant part of their voter base.

On planning, development within urban infill areas and especially in established middle suburbs often encounters fierce resistance from local property owners irrespective of the broader need for greater housing supply in these areas.

Again, the wealthy and politically active are favoured.

When new residential zones were introduced throughout Victoria in 2013, local councils in wealthy Melbourne municipalities such as Bayside, Glen Eira and Boroondara rushed to apply the most restrictive of the zones to three quarters of their municipalities despite their municipalities being well serviced by transport links, cultural and education facilities and having close proximity to employment opportunities.
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Finally, there are the least powerful stakeholders: social housing tenants. Over the five years to June 2017, the number of public sector houses approved for construction throughout Australia came in at just 17,012 – the lowest rate of building for several decades and less than half of the 38,448 public houses approved over the same period 20 years earlier. This is happening as around 200,000 sit on social housing waiting lists (AIHW statistics, June 2016).

The quality of that housing is not great. In a recent survey conducted by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, half of all public housing tenants reported at least one structural problem such as major cracks or rising damp with their dwelling. One in six dwellings had three or more serious structural problems.

These people are too few in number and too politically inactive for their voice to be heard. Numbering around 817,300 (excluding those on waiting lists), social housing tenants comprise less than four per cent of the population. Moreover, with this cohort being seen as largely ‘Safe Labour’ voters, neither major party expends much energy in battling over their vote.

Because of this, Murray says there is ‘no political appetite whatsoever’ for public housing investment.

Murray says the consequences of all this are serious. In regard to the land rezoning and infrastructure provision, he says taxpayers are handing billions of dollars’ worth of gains each year to private developers.

Due to influence associated with political favouritism, these decisions are not necessarily reflecting the best interests of society.

Spending billions in taxpayer money to put railways out to some wasteland where influential developers have land holdings is wasteful, he said.

Finally, favouritism of toward existing home owners and the consequential failure to address housing affordability is leading to a significant social divide.

He says action is needed across several areas. First, he would like to see the removal of tax concessions for residential property investment.

More social housing should also be constructed, and this should be done according to a needs-based system.
Rights of long-term renters should also be improved along the lines of models adopted in some European countries which limit the ability of landlords to increase rents.

Beyond that, he would like to see action to reduce the opportunity and incentive for favouritism and corruption to occur.
To address the ‘revolving door’, he would like restrictions upon the ability of those who work in public sector planning roles to accept private sector work in the development industry for a set time after they leave public office.

Moreover, to reduce the overall incentive for grey corruption to occur, he would like to see the implementation of value capture measures. In particular, he would other states and territories to follow the current system in the ACT, whereby landowners who apply to have their land rezoned pay an upfront charge equal to 75 per cent of the assessed uplift in land values which occur from the rezoning.

Under that system, the gains associated with the revaluation are split 75/25 between taxpayers and the developer. Merely doing across all other states and territories, he says could raise $11 billion per year for taxpayers.

Likewise, additional value capture mechanisms such as taxes on the unimproved value of land would enable taxpayers to automatically capture back part of the uplift in land values which occurs as a result of public sector infrastructure investments.

He says the best way to tackle corruption of any kind – legal or otherwise – is to reduce the size of the value which can be gained from such activities.

Phibbs agrees that restrictions on the ability of those involved in public sector planning decisions to work for private developers for a period after leaving public office are needed.

To improve transparency, meanwhile, he would like every rezoning decision to be made public along with an assessment of the uplift in land value associated with that decision and contact details of those involved with the decision.

This, he argues, would make gains associated with land rezoning more transparent and would make those involved in decision making more accountable.

Gruen agrees that capturing back the value of any gain is essential. He says a betterment tax like that first proposed in the 1890s by American Economist Henry Gorge under which tax is levied on increases in the unimproved capital value of the land would be one of the few taxes which did not harm economic efficiency and was fair.

Australia relies on its politicians and public-sector staff to act in the public’s best interest at all times.

Despite the best efforts of many, it seems that decision making is largely impacted by the vested interests of powerful stakeholders.

by Andrew Heaton

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HOMELESSNESS IN NSW JUMPS BY MORE THAN 30 PER CENT

 

A tent is set up directly opposite the Reserve Bank of Australia at Martin Place. Picture: AAP.

 

HOMELESSNESS IN NSW JUMPS BY MORE THAN 30 PER CENT

NSW has recorded the most severe jump in homelessness between the 2011 and 2016 Census … coinciding with the LNP gaining control of Government in NSW!

During that time the government has sold off much of its Public Housing Estates … alleging to raise revenue … to developers for private apartment development … with up to 100% of that development being sold to foreign buyers

$BILLIONS of Our Public Assets have been transferred in a pipeline to “the Mates”!

The job of a government is to ensure the infrastructure is there for Society!  Also despite

$Billions in Stamp Duty coffers … it appears the revenue is either being retained or wasted on very bad infrastructure projects like WestConnex, NorthConnex, the Eastern Suburbs light rail, the NorthWest Metro … all of which are to be privatised!

Tenants of Public Housing – which incidentally has been transferred to Charities in the Social Housing Sector – lose their friends, family and social networks as they are forced to accept accommodation far flung from where they have resided. Some redevelopment of housing has occurred in the urban fringes making it also difficult for people to find work, and transport!

Homelessness in NSW jumps by more than 30 per cent

By James Robertson & Miki Perkins
14 March 2018

The number of people who are homeless in NSW has soared by more than one-third, with newly released census data showing people living in “severely” overcrowded dwellings are the greatest contributor to this increase.

NSW recorded the most severe jump in homelessness of any state or territory between the 2016 and 2011 censuses. In 2011 the number of homeless people in NSW was 28,191 but reached 37,715 last census night, the statistics bureau found.

In the City of Sydney (ABS data is divided up by local government area), the number of people who were homeless on census night increased by almost 70 per cent.

Tykara Lang became homeless while studying for her HSC.
Photo: Dominic Lorrimer

Accounting for all categories of homelessness, from those “sleeping rough” to people who are couch surfing, the state’s 37 per cent increase was more than double the national average of 14 per cent.

But the largest increase was recorded in the categories of people living in overcrowded dwellings, which rose by just under 75 per cent, and young people aged between 19 and 24, whose numbers rose more than 90 per cent.

Housing stress pushed Tykara Lang into homelessness at a time when most teenagers’ lives are defined by the stress of preparing for HSC exams.

Ms Lang, 19, was seeking new accommodation after living with her grandmother whose lease expired when she moved into an aged-care facility, and as the teenager’s HSC trials were coming up.

She was able to find temporary accommodation but in less than ideal circumstances.

“It was a rough arrangement. I was doing my half-yearlies for the HSC and living in a [place mainly for] people for drug and alcohol problems, which I don’t [have].
“But a bed had just opened up.”

Ms Lang found help from Mission Australia after looking them up online. The organisation provided her with a case worker and advocate who found her new temporary accommodation in the inner-city she shares with one flatmate.

Despite the challenges she faced in year 12 Ms Lang has recently started studying nursing at TAFE and has secured transitional accommodation she shares with one housemate while she studies.

But advocates decried the latest statistics as an international embarrassment and said outcomes like Ms Lang’s were increasingly rare as many of the state’s homelessness services now verged on breaking point.

The chief executive of St Vincent de Paul Society NSW, Jack de Groot, said: “It’s time for the state government tells us its plan to deal with the issue.”

The CEO of Mission Australia, James Toomey, said national figures showing 116,000 people homeless in 2016 reflected the need for co-ordinated federal action.

The CEO of Homelessness NSW, Katherine McKernan, said an increase in homelessness during a five-year period when the state and the state government were enjoying sustained economic growth was not acceptable.

The state government last year committed to tender a second tranche of social housing for its 3400-home social housing fund, which is backed by more than $1 billion in investment.

But Ms McKernan said with only 1 per cent of housing in the greater city accessible to those on low incomes, large-scale investment in more social housing was needed quickly. The waiting list for public housing in NSW now runs to 60,000 people.

Ms Lang, who attributed support from nurses during difficult hospital stays in her youth inspired her choice of study, said support from Mission Australia had provided a case worker, psychologist and dietitian that had helped her not just to find a new path in life but to maintain her mental health after being diagnosed with depression and an eating disorder in her youth.

But so, too, has the routine of home.

“Everyone thrives on stability,” she said. “Knowing where I’m going to be tomorrow helps so much.”

James Robertson
James Robertson was a reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald.

Miki Perkins
Miki Perkins is a senior journalist and Social Affairs Editor at The Age.

SOURCE: https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/homelessness-in-nsw-jumps-by-more-than-30-per-cent-20180314-p4z4ds.html

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Think there are no homeless people in your area? Think again

 

 

Think there are no homeless people in your area? Think again

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-20/homelessness-mapped-australia-by-suburb/9551556

The 2016 CENSUS revealed there were some 117,000 homeless people in Australia …

HOW MANY MORE NOW?

NSW LNP has sold off much of our Public Housing Estates to their mates

Australia’s population grew by 400,000 in 2017 from permanent and Visa migration …

Developers can sell 100% of new home projects to wealthy overseas buyers(FIRB 2009)

With the lure of buying Australian Real Estate overseas buyers can gain Residency …

MANY AUSTRALIANS are one pay cheque away from homelessness …

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THINK THERE ARE NO HOMELESS PEOPLE IN YOUR AREA? THINK AGAIN

 

Interactive Digital Storytelling team

Updated 

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has released 2016 Census data showing more than 100,000 Australians are homeless — and revealing they live in virtually every part of the country.

The Council of Homeless People says the map shows homelessness is a “national epidemic”.

See how many homeless people are in your suburb. You can zoom, pan or enter your suburb and state (eg. Camp Hill, Qld) to search.

The homeless rate across the country is 50 people per 10,000, with high numbers of homeless both in highly populated city centres but also in regional areas.

To understand why, it is worth looking at how the ABS defines homelessness.

As well as people sleeping rough, it also includes people in shelters, boarding houses, temporary housing or those living in severely crowded houses.

Demographer Liz Allen from ANU said homelessness was not about the absence of a roof, but the absence of a secure home.

“Australia has a problem with housing that goes beyond the traditional idea of sleeping rough,” she said.

“It would surprise many people to know people next door in a middle-class neighbourhood could be experiencing homelessness.

The largest category, representing nearly half of those people counted as homeless, is overcrowding and two-thirds of people in that category were born overseas.

Severely crowded dwellings are defined as requiring four or more extra bedrooms to house the people who usually live there and according to the ABS, was the greatest contributor to the national increase in homelessness of nearly 5 per cent since the last census.

Indigenous people represent 20 per cent of the homeless, and nearly three-quarters of those were living in severely crowded dwellings.

Dr Allen said the map highlighted how many Indigenous people in remote areas were living in insecure housing.

“Aboriginal Australians are experiencing very high levels of inadequate, inhospitable and insecure housing and that undoubtedly impacts on health, social and community engagement,” she said.

Homeless people by area

SORT BY

Statistical Area 2Number of homeless people
Statistical Area 2 Number of homeless people
East Arnhem 3507
Sydney – Haymarket – The Rocks 1662
West Arnhem 1284
Gulf 1221
Melbourne 928
Thamarrurr 860
Sandover – Plenty 781
Dandenong 707
Auburn – Central 661
Perth City 641
Adelaide 626
Darlinghurst 612
St Kilda 580
Elsey 554
Yarrabah 549
Spring Hill 546
Ashfield 545
Palm Island 527
Auburn – North 524
Burwood – Croydon 512
New Farm 512
Surry Hills 507
Redfern – Chippendale 491
Cairns City 469
Cabramatta – Lansvale 451
Petersham – Stanmore 448
Derby – West Kimberley 424
Darwin City 418
Katherine 418
Strathfield 417
Glebe – Forest Lodge 411
Tanami 409
Marrickville 404
Carpentaria 391
Potts Point – Woolloomooloo 382
Springvale 377
Parramatta – Rosehill 362
Lakemba 357
Anindilyakwa 346
Guildford – South Granville 342
Fortitude Valley 342
Pyrmont – Ultimo 337
Canterbury (South) – Campsie 337
Yuendumu – Anmatjere 334
Clayton 323
South Brisbane 321
Victoria River 319
Enfield – Blair Athol 317
Tennant Creek 317
East Pilbara 313
North Melbourne 309
Merrylands – Holroyd 308
Liverpool 306
Barkly 304
Footscray 302
APY Lands 297
Bankstown – South 278
Granville – Clyde 275
Fairfield 273
Halls Creek 272
Brisbane City 271
Caboolture 269
Cape York 269
Daly 268
Mount Isa 266
St Kilda East 264
Arncliffe – Bardwell Valley 263
Hurstville 260
Leinster – Leonora 257
Ashcroft – Busby – Miller 256
Waterloo – Beaconsfield 254
Armidale 252
Canley Vale – Canley Heights 248
Dandenong North 244
Kununurra 240
Fremantle 237
Punchbowl 236
Richmond (Vic.) 236
Neutral Bay – Kirribilli 235
Lidcombe 234
Fairfield – East 232
Manunda 232
Newtown – Camperdown – Darlington 230
St Albans – North 228
Hampton Park – Lynbrook 227
Leichhardt – Annandale 225
Fitzroy 223
Shepparton – South 220
Sunshine West 218
Rockdale – Banksia 215
Frankston 213
Reservoir – East 211
Paddington – Moore Park 208
The Parks 206
Box Hill 200
Townsville City – North Ward 198
Aurukun 196
Noble Park – West 194
Burwood 193
Seven Hills – Toongabbie 192
St Albans – South 192
Torres Strait Islands 192
Roxburgh Park – Somerton 191
Smithfield – Wetherill Park 188
Yagoona – Birrong 187
Claymore – Eagle Vale – Raby 187
Southport – North 187
Broome 187
Guildford West – Merrylands West 185
Surfers Paradise 183
Fairfield – West 182
Deer Park – Derrimut 181
Woodridge 180
Nhulunbuy 180
Homebush 178
Noble Park – East 177
Narre Warren South (West) 174
Bondi Junction – Waverly 172
Brunswick 170
Cabramatta West – Mount Pritchard 169
Rockhampton City 169
Thomastown 168
Kingaroy Region – North 167
Gosford – Springfield 165
Hindmarsh – Brompton 165
Kingsford 164
Nambour 162
Mascot – Eastlakes 161
Corio – Norlane 161
Wollongong – West 160
Mount Druitt – Whalan 160
Pendle Hill – Girraween 159
Frankston North 158
Tweed Heads 156
Charles 156
Bidwill – Hebersham – Emerton 154
Reservoir – West 154
Tiwi Islands 154
Lismore 153
Bass Hill – Georges Hall 153
Bossley Park – Abbotsbury 153
Southport – South 151
Doonside – Woodcroft 150
Wodonga 150
Byron Bay 146
North Parramatta 146
Inala – Richlands 146
Campbell 146
Malvern East 145
Campbellfield – Coolaroo 145
Hamilton – Broadmeadow 144
Ludmilla – The Narrows 144
Preston – East 143
Lalor 143
Randwick – South 142
Dulwich Hill – Lewisham 142
Braybrook 142
Doveton 141
Kingsbury 140
Haberfield – Summer Hill 139
Werribee – East 139
Bonnyrigg Heights – Bonnyrigg 138
Toowoomba – Central 138
Auburn – South 137
West Footscray – Tottenham 137
Bentley – Wilson – St James 137
Fitzroy North 136
Hawthorn 136
Bankstown – North 134
Northern Peninsula 134
Christie Downs 134
Mayfield – Warabrook 132
Ashwood – Chadstone 132
Tarneit 132
Kingston (Qld.) 132
Elizabeth 132
Bexley 131
Meadow Heights 131
Beckenham – Kenwick – Langford 131
Carlton 129
Springvale South 129
Salisbury 129
Blacktown (West) 128
South Hurstville – Blakehurst 128
Gympie Region 128
Newcastle – Cooks Hill 127
Walgett – Lightning Ridge 126
Rosemeadow – Glen Alpine 126
St Marys – North St Marys 126
Flemington 126
Penrith 125
Berala 125
Kelvin Grove – Herston 125
Ballarat 123
Macgregor (Qld) 123
Griffith (NSW) 122
Coogee – Clovelly 122
Belmore – Belfield 122
Macquarie Park – Marsfield 122
Fawkner 122
Mackay 122
Mullumbimby 121
Chester Hill – Sefton 121
South Hedland 120
Sunshine North 119
Mildura – North 119
Murray Bridge 119
Kalgoorlie 119
Sydenham – Tempe – St Peters 118
Macquarie Fields – Glenfield 118
Eastwood – Denistone 118
Wentworthville – Westmead 116
Glenroy 116
Ardeer – Albion 115
Caboolture – South 115
Ingleburn – Denham Court 114
Alligator 114
Broadmeadows 113
Woolloongabba 113
Slacks Creek 113
Coffs Harbour – North 112
Castlereagh – Cranebrook 112
Bairnsdale 112
Ascot Vale 112
Boronia 112
Labrador 112
Ross 111
Campbelltown – Woodbine 110
Thornbury 110
Armadale – Wungong – Brookdale 110
Chatswood (East) – Artarmon 109
Bradbury – Wedderburn 109
Morwell 109
Maddington – Orange Grove – Martin 109
Meekatharra 109
Port Macquarie – West 108
Pakenham – South 108
Annerley 108
Torres 108
Port Augusta 108
Nowra 107
Blacktown (East) – Kings Park 107
Kowanyama – Pormpuraaw 107
Cannington – Queens Park 107
Geraldton 107
Wollongong – East 106
Manly – Fairlight 106
Grovedale 106
New Town 106
Bondi – Tamarama – Bronte 105
Randwick – North 105
Kew 105
Cranbourne 105
Sunnybank 105
Maroochydore – Kuluin 105
Bondi Beach – North Bondi 104
Sunshine 104
Paralowie 104
Grafton Region 103
Crestmead 103
Richmond (SA) 103
Bathurst 102
Freshwater – Brookvale 102
Belmont 101
Kings Park (Vic.) 101
Balga – Mirrabooka 101
Cranbourne North 100
Minto – St Andrews 99
Heidelberg West 99
Westcourt – Bungalow 99
Mount Hawthorn – Leederville 99
Morisset – Cooranbong 98
Kingswood – Werrington 98
Hallam 98
Sunnybank Hills 98
St Lucia 98
Bowen 98
Hobart 98
Berkeley – Lake Heights – Cringila 97
Truganina 97
Bassendean – Eden Hill – Ashfield 97
Stuart Park 97
Petermann – Simpson 97
Rooty Hill – Minchinbury 96
Laverton 96
Central Highlands – West 96
Wyong 95
Collingwood 95
Bundaberg 95
Morphett Vale – West 95
Carnegie 94
Ringwood 94
Exmouth 94
Kempsey 93
Lismore Region 93
Wiley Park 93
Concord West – North Strathfield 93
Crows Nest – Waverton 93
Northcote 93
Southbank 93
Fremantle – South 93
Humpty Doo 93
Croydon Park – Enfield 92
Ballarat – North 92
Wyndham Vale 92
Pooraka – Cavan 92
Brinkin – Nakara 92
Turner 92
Dubbo – East 91
Kensington (NSW) 91
Lethbridge Park – Tregear 90
Erskineville – Alexandria 90
Rivervale – Kewdale – Cloverdale 90
Grafton 89
Riverwood 89
South Melbourne 89
Ormond – Glen Huntly 89
Pascoe Vale 89
Ipswich – Central 89
Goodna 88
Gympie – North 88
Port Macquarie – East 87
Double Bay – Bellevue Hill 87
Richmond – Clarendon 87
Colyton – Oxley Park 87
Rosebud – McCrae 87
Warrnambool – North 87
Gulliver – Currajong – Vincent 87
Whyalla 87
Tamworth – North 86
Coburg 86
Hughesdale 86
Wooloowin – Lutwyche 86
Salisbury North 86
Lalor Park – Kings Langley 85
Geelong 85
Clayton South 85
Shepparton – North 85
Sandgate – Shorncliffe 85
Coolangatta 85
Chatswood (West) – Lane Cove North 84
Mandurah 84
Roebuck 84
Blacktown (North) – Marayong 83
Kingaroy 83
Roebourne 83
Larapinta 83
Runcorn 82
Nollamara – Westminster 82
Hamilton Hill 82
Oakleigh – Huntingdale 81
Earlville – Bayview Heights 81
East Victoria Park – Carlisle 81
Larrakeyah 81
Gorokan – Kanwal – Charmhaven 80
Dee Why – North Curl Curl 80
Mulgoa – Luddenham – Orchard Hills 80
Doncaster 80
Keysborough 80
Kingston – Huntingfield 80
Figtree – Keiraville 79
Shortland – Jesmond 78
Kingsgrove (North) – Earlwood 78
Elwood 78
Mooroolbark 78
Gatton 78
Para Hills 78
Morley 78
Warilla 77
Port Melbourne 77
Clarinda – Oakleigh South 77
Parafield Gardens 77
Midland – Guildford 77
Dapto – Avondale 76
Taree 76
Essendon – Aberfeldie 76
Toowong 76
Edwardstown 76
Tamworth – East 75
Darling Heights 75
Broken Hill 74
Ballarat – South 74
Wendouree – Miners Rest 74
Mornington 74
Kanimbla – Mooroobool 74
Lowood 74
Torquay – Scarness – Kawungan 74
Port Lincoln 74
East Side 74
Erina – Green Point 73
Newcomb – Moolap 73
Prahran – Windsor 73
Adamstown – Kotara 72
Northmead 72
Wangaratta 72
Cairnlea 72
Malabar – La Perouse – Chifley 71
Epping – North Epping 71
Cranbourne West 71
Rocklea – Acacia Ridge 71
Highgate Hill 71
Atherton 71
Craigieburn – Central 70
Healesville – Yarra Glen 70
Central Highlands – East 70
Redbank Plains 70
Garbutt – West End 70
Busselton 70
Coconut Grove 70
Reid 70
Umina – Booker Bay – Patonga 69
St Johns Park – Wakeley 69
Lurnea – Cartwright 69
Abbotsford 69
Mordialloc – Parkdale 69
Newport 69
Echuca 69
Maryborough Region – South 69
Madeley – Darch – Landsdale 69
Devonport 69
Woolgoolga – Arrawarra 68
Corrimal – Tarrawanna – Bellambi 68
Preston – West 68
Melton 68
Seaford (Vic.) 68
Moorooka 68
West End 68
Edmonton 68
Noosa Hinterland 68
Bayswater – Embleton – Bedford 68
Coffs Harbour – South 67
Goonellabah 67
Toongabbie – Constitution Hill 67
Parkville 67
South Yarra – East 67
Ferntree Gully (North) 67
Kuranda 67
Northgate – Oakden – Gilles Plains 67
Alexander Heights – Koondoola 67
Moree Region 66
Roselands 66
Hornsby – East 66
Jamisontown – South Penrith 66
West Ryde – Meadowbank 66
Ryde 66
Caulfield – South 66
Cheltenham – Highett (East) 66
Nerang – Mount Nathan 66
Marsden 66
Gin Gin 66
South Lake – Cockburn Central 66
Karratha 66
Strathpine – Brendale 65
Paradise – Newton 65
Craigmore – Blakeview 65
Plympton 65
Port Pirie 65
Scone Region 64
Hassall Grove – Plumpton 64
Oatlands – Dundas Valley 64
Docklands 64
Burleigh Heads 64
Maryborough (Qld) 64
Davoren Park 64
Moree 63
Panania – Milperra – Picnic Point 63
Lockyer Valley – East 63
Bellevue Heights 63
Maylands 63
The Entrance 62
Ringwood East 62
Mulgrave 62
Hastings – Somers 62
Manoora 62
Proserpine 62
Port Kembla – Warrawong 61
Padstow 61
Lane Cove – Greenwich 61
Katoomba – Leura 61
Warrnambool – South 61
East Brisbane 61
Mount Gambier – East 61
Jindabyne – Berridale 60
Sawtell – Boambee 60
Cessnock 60
Waratah – North Lambton 60
Revesby 60
Narwee – Beverly Hills 60
Casula 60
Werribee – West 60
Robinvale 60
Mitchell Park 60
Howard Springs 60
Prestons – Edmondson Park 59
Bendigo 59
Kangaroo Flat – Golden Square 59
Elsternwick 59
Chermside 59
Fairfield – Dutton Park 59
Tully 59
Mareeba 59
Elizabeth East 59
Dianella 59
Tiwi 59
Greenacre – Mount Lewis 58
Cambridge Park 58
Traralgon 58
Croydon – East 58
Altona North 58
Eight Mile Plains 58
Colonel Light Gardens 58
Palmerston – North 58
Berwick – North 57
Melton South 57
Windsor 57
Ipswich – East 57
Logan Central 57
Seaforth – Calen 57
Berri 57
Weddell 57
Viewbank – Yallambie 56
Mitcham (Vic.) 56
Bacchus Marsh 56
Hoppers Crossing – North 56
Coopers Plains 56
Pialba – Eli Waters 56
Flinders Park 56
Mount Gambier – West 56
Thornlie 56
Boulder 56
Mount Johns 56
Wagga Wagga – West 55
Riverstone – Marsden Park 55
Botany 55
Leumeah – Minto Heights 55
Ermington – Rydalmere 55
Green Valley 55
Greenfield Park – Prairiewood 55
Brighton (Vic.) 55
Kangaroo Point 55
Gladstone 55
Deception Bay 55
Margate – Woody Point 55
South Bunbury – Bunbury 55
Spearwood 55
Beacon Hill – Narraweena 54
St Clair 54
Carlingford 54
Craigieburn – South 54
Carrum Downs 54
Jimboomba 54
Tablelands 54
Girrawheen 54
Lavington 53
Glendenning – Dean Park 53
Cremorne – Cammeray 53
Geelong West – Hamlyn Heights 53
Yarra – North 53
Box Hill North 53
Watsonia 53
Hoppers Crossing – South 53
Colac 53
Yeronga 53
Miami 53
Redcliffe 53
Burrum – Fraser 53
Belmont – Ascot – Redcliffe 53
Goulburn Region 52
Ballina 52
Murwillumbah Region 52
Mortdale – Penshurst 52
Sutherland – Kirrawee 52
Red Hill (Qld) 52
Airlie – Whitsundays 52
Morayfield – East 52
Burdekin 52
St Peters – Marden 52
Joondalup – Edgewater 52
Gingin – Dandaragan 52
Sandy Bay 52
Goulburn 51
Kingscliff – Fingal Head 51
Mosman 51
Yarramundi – Londonderry 51
Hawthorn East 51
Caulfield – North 51
Altona Meadows 51
Werribee – South 51
Gladstone Hinterland 51
West Gladstone 51
West Mackay 51
Dubbo – South 50
Edensor Park 50
Kensington (Vic.) 50
Moorabbin – Heatherton 50
Mill Park – North 50
Lynbrook – Lyndhurst 50
Wynnum 50
Tara 50
North Ipswich – Tivoli 50
Urangan – Wondunna 50
Windsor Gardens 50
Warradale 50
Port Adelaide 50
Stirling – Osborne Park 50
Claremont (Tas.) 50
Balgownie – Fairy Meadow 49
Murwillumbah 49
Warriewood – Mona Vale 49
Hadfield 49
Croydon – West 49
Delahey 49
Hillside 49
Capalaba 49
Mount Gravatt 49
Roma Region 49
Forest Lake – Doolandella 49
Underwood 49
Wembley – West Leederville – Glendalough 49
Forrestfield – Wattle Grove 49
Merredin 49
Highton 48
East Melbourne 48
Hampton 48
Malvern – Glen Iris 48
Epping – East 48
Seddon – Kingsville 48
Robertson 48
Caloundra – Kings Beach 48
Kelso 48
Cooloola 48
Renmark 48
Manning – Waterford 48
Burnie – Wivenhoe 48
O’Connor (ACT) 48
Bega – Tathra 47
Glendale – Cardiff – Hillsborough 47
Tweed Heads South 47
Baulkham Hills (West) – Bella Vista 47
Windsor – Bligh Park 47
Greystanes – Pemulwuy 47
East Bendigo – Kennington 47
Brunswick West 47
Alphington – Fairfield 47
Caloundra Hinterland 47
Gayndah – Mundubbera 47
Mount Lawley – Inglewood 47
Beechboro 47
Canning Vale – East 47
Braddon 47
Wickham – Carrington – Tighes Hill 46
Narrabeen – Collaroy 46
Chipping Norton – Moorebank 46
Flora Hill – Spring Gully 46
Doncaster East (South) 46
Burwood East 46
Knoxfield – Scoresby 46
Cranbourne East 46
Melton West 46
Mermaid Beach – Broadbeach 46
Durack 46
Wilsonton 46
Seaton – Grange 46
Ulverstone 46
Kaleen 46
Dickson 46
Woy Woy – Blackwall 45
Kempsey Region 45
Banora Point 45
Castlemaine 45
Murrumbeena 45
Sunbury – South 45
Glen Waverley – West 45
Maribyrnong 45
Ararat 45
Newmarket 45
Yeppoon 45
Mudgeeraba – Bonogin 45
Darra – Sumner 45
Kirwan – East 45
Woodville – Cheltenham 45
Margaret River 45
Swan View – Greenmount – Midvale 45
Gosnells 45
Yass Region 44
Calga – Kulnura 44
Casino 44
Baulkham Hills (East) 44
Dural – Kenthurst – Wisemans Ferry 44
Blacktown (South) 44
Concord – Mortlake – Cabarita 44
North Geelong – Bell Park 44
Coburg North 44
Northgate – Virginia 44
Currumbin – Tugun 44
Oxley (Qld) 44
Loganlea 44
Ashburton (WA) 44
Newnham – Mayfield 44
Orange 43
Bellingen 43
Wallsend – Elermore Vale 43
Manly Vale – Allambie Heights 43
Cobbitty – Leppington 43
California Gully – Eaglehawk 43
Moonee Ponds 43
Bundoora – West 43
Lilydale – Coldstream 43
Narre Warren – South West 43
Scarborough – Newport – Moreton Island 43
Naracoorte 43
Ellenbrook 43
Tuart Hill – Joondanna 43
Victoria Park – Lathlain – Burswood 43
Katanning 43
Moruya – Tuross Head 42
Maitland – West 42
Pottsville 42
Kellyville 42
Condell Park 42
Balmain 42
Asquith – Mount Colah 42
Cronulla – Kurnell – Bundeena 42
Loddon 42
Nunawading 42
Bethania – Waterford 42
Bundaberg East – Kalkie 42
Royal Park – Hendon – Albert Park 42
Northam 42
Mornington – Warrane 42
Toukley – Norah Head 41
Lithgow 41
Quakers Hill 41
Frenchs Forest – Belrose 41
Seymour 41
Yarraville 41
Greenslopes 41
Ashgrove 41
Agnes Water – Miriam Vale 41
Ormeau – Yatala 41
Upper Coomera – Willow Vale 41
Collie 41
Ballajura 41
Northampton – Mullewa – Greenough 41
Fannie Bay – The Gardens 41
Nightcliff 41
Narrabundah 41
Bathurst – East 40
Maitland – East 40
Raymond Terrace 40
Charlestown – Dudley 40
North Nowra – Bomaderry 40
Kurrajong Heights – Ebenezer 40
Armadale 40
Chelsea – Bonbeach 40
Belgrave – Selby 40
Yarra Valley 40
Pakenham – North 40
Glen Waverley – East 40
Frankston South 40
Calamvale – Stretton 40
Emerald 40
Toowoomba – West 40
Bargara – Burnett Heads 40
Kelmscott 40
Baldivis 40
Wyoming 39
Far West 39
Muswellbrook 39
Moe – Newborough 39
Herberton 39
Parkwood 39
Boonah 39
Dakabin – Kallangur 39
Unley – Parkside 39
Smithfield – Elizabeth North 39
Berrimah 39
Rapid Creek 39
Young 38
Albion Park Rail 38
Woonona – Bulli – Russell Vale 38
Bilpin – Colo – St Albans 38
Drummoyne – Rodd Point 38
Warwick Farm 38
Delacombe 38
Benalla 38
Warragul 38
Epping – South 38
Gladstone Park – Westmeadows 38
Noble Park North 38
Horsham 38
Rockhampton Region – North 38
Browns Plains 38
Aitkenvale 38
Hermit Park – Rosslea 38
Prospect 38
Mandurah – East 38
Mandurah – South 38
Seville Grove 38
Parmelia – Orelia 38
Bellerive – Rosny 38
Glenorchy 38
South Launceston 38
Civic 38
Maclean – Yamba – Iluka 37
Ulladulla 37
Austral – Greendale 37
Bentleigh East (South) 37
Forest Hill 37
Cranbourne South 37
Mildura – South 37
Newstead – Bowen Hills 37
Brassall 37
Bundamba 37
Mount Isa Region 37
Palmwoods 37
Tinana 37
Hackham West – Huntfield Heights 37
Subiaco – Shenton Park 37
Lockridge – Kiara 37
Wanneroo 37
Glenwood 36
Albert Park 36
Bayswater 36
Birkdale 36
Manly West 36
Bentley Park 36
Robina 36
Morphett Vale – East 36
Beverley 36
Albany 36
Durack – Marlow Lagoon 36
Lyneham 36
Kambah 36
Bourke – Brewarrina 35
Nelson Bay Peninsula 35
Kogarah 35
Lawson – Hazelbrook – Linden 35
Lakes Entrance 35
Orbost 35
Korumburra 35
Sale 35
Mount Waverley – South 35
Mooroopna 35
Holland Park 35
Innisfail 35
Eagleby 35
Daisy Hill 35
Lockleys 35
Esperance 35
Millner 35
Wauchope 34
Blackheath – Megalong Valley 34
Wonthaggi – Inverloch 34
Blackburn 34
Craigieburn – West 34
Altona 34
Alexandra Hills 34
Bald Hills 34
Carina 34
Upper Mount Gravatt 34
Rockhampton – West 34
Currumbin Valley – Tallebudgera 34
Leichhardt – One Mile 34
Pioneer Valley 34
Bribie Island 34
Bray Park 34
Parrearra – Warana 34
Eumundi – Yandina 34
Panorama 34
Seaford (SA) 34
Largs Bay – Semaphore 34
Ngunnawal 34
Merimbula – Tura Beach 33
Bateau Bay – Killarney Vale 33
Albury – East 33
Tamworth Region 33
Bowral 33
Five Dock – Abbotsford 33
Normanhurst – Thornleigh – Westleigh 33
Lara 33
Eltham 33
Taylors Hill 33
Tingalpa 33
Woree 33
Beachmere – Sandstone Point 33
Walkervale – Avenell Heights 33
Mount Barker 33
Ingle Farm 33
Launceston 33
Virginia 33
Canberra East 33
Bolton Point – Teralba 32
Woollahra 32
Kogarah Bay – Carlton – Allawah 32
Canterbury (North) – Ashbury 32
Regents Park 32
Drouin 32
Keilor Downs 32
Kyabram 32
Daintree 32
The Range – Allenstown 32
Palm Beach 32
Collingwood Park – Redbank 32
Cashmere 32
North Toowoomba – Harlaxton 32
Ayr 32
Kirwan – West 32
Bundaberg Region – North 32
Glenelg (SA) 32
Outback 32
Derwent Park – Lutana 32
Gungahlin 32
Inverell 31
Belmont – Bennetts Green 31
Bangalow 31
Rose Bay – Vaucluse – Watsons Bay 31
Kyneton 31
Carlton North – Princes Hill 31
Heidelberg – Rosanna 31
Caroline Springs 31
Stafford 31
Coorparoo 31
Salisbury – Nathan 31
Molendinar 31
Wacol 31
Burpengary 31
Lockyer Valley – West 31
Rostrevor – Magill 31
Busselton Region 31
Carnarvon 31
Newstead 31
Woodroffe 31
Fyshwick 31
Forbes 30
Laurieton – Bonny Hills 30
Glen Innes 30
Berwick – South 30
Taigum – Fitzgibbon 30
Biloela 30
Helensvale 30
Varsity Lakes 30
Regents Park – Heritage Park 30
Hyde Park – Pimlico 30
Hope Valley – Modbury 30
Ceduna 30
Balcatta – Hamersley 30
Butler – Merriwa – Ridgewood 30
Mount Hutton – Windale 29
Brunswick Heads – Ocean Shores 29
Griffith Region 29
Tumut Region 29
St Ives 29
Emu Plains – Leonay 29
Miranda – Yowie Bay 29
South Yarra – West 29
Bentleigh East (North) 29
Mill Park – South 29
Wantirna South 29
Warrandyte – Wonga Park 29
Bayswater North 29
Zillmere 29
Hamilton (Qld) 29
Wambo 29
Moranbah 29
Caloundra – West 29
West Lakes 29
West Coast (SA) 29
Kalamunda – Maida Vale – Gooseberry Hill 29
Parklands – Camdale 29
Karama 29
Belconnen 29
Dunlop 29
Karabar 28
Queanbeyan 28
Narooma – Bermagui 28
Mudgee Region – West 28
Singleton 28
Maitland 28
Williamtown – Medowie – Karuah 28
Unanderra – Mount Kembla 28
Shellharbour – Flinders 28
Forster 28
Nambucca Heads Region 28
Warners Bay – Boolaroo 28
Toronto – Awaba 28
Leeton 28
Monterey – Brighton-le-Sands – Kyeemagh 28
Douglas Park – Appin 28
Ashburton (Vic.) 28
Bulleen 28
Epping – West 28
Narre Warren South (East) 28
Mount Waverley – North 28
Sydenham 28
Williamstown 28
Portland 28
Redland Bay 28
Paddington – Milton 28
Port Douglas 28
Rosewood 28
Boronia Heights – Park Ridge 28
Walkerston – Eton 28
Narangba 28
Samford Valley 28
Drayton – Harristown 28
Nanango 28
Payneham – Felixstow 28
Hackham – Onkaparinga Hills 28
Riverton – Shelley – Rossmoyne 28
Willetton 28
Rockingham 28
Longford 28
Lake Munmorah – Mannering Park 27
Dungog 27
Nambucca Heads 27
Kyogle 27
Hoxton Park – Carnes Hill – Horningsea Park 27
Camberwell 27
Blackburn South 27
Cheltenham – Highett (West) 27
Montmorency – Briar Hill 27
Wollert 27
Redlynch 27
Babinda 27
Mooloolaba – Alexandra Headland 27
Tewantin 27
Landsborough 27
Condon – Rasmussen 27
Monto – Eidsvold 27
Brighton (SA) 27
Morphettville 27
Mitcham (SA) 27
Nedlands – Dalkeith – Crawley 27
Marangaroo 27
Parkwood – Ferndale – Lynwood 27
Page 27
Cooma 26
Wagga Wagga – South 26
Wagga Wagga Region 26
Castle Hill – Central 26
Lilyfield – Rozelle 26
Gordon – Killara 26
Hinchinbrook 26
Illawong – Alfords Point 26
Maryborough (Vic.) 26
Seymour Region 26
Bruthen – Omeo 26
Brunswick East 26
Bentleigh – McKinnon 26
Bunyip – Garfield 26
Burnside Heights 26
Swan Hill 26
Kedron – Gordon Park 26
Malanda – Yungaburra 26
Berserker 26
Waterford West 26
Gawler – South 26
Munno Para West – Angle Vale 26
Eaton – Pelican Point 26
Dodges Ferry – Lewisham 26
Florey 26
Queanbeyan Region 25
Kingsgrove (South) – Bardwell Park 25
Waitara – Wahroonga (West) 25
West Wodonga 25
Surrey Hills (West) – Canterbury 25
Craigieburn – North 25
Narre Warren – North East 25
Numurkah 25
Manly – Lota 25
Nundah 25
Holland Park West 25
Chapel Hill 25
Taringa 25
Alderley 25
The Hills District 25
Toowoomba – East 25
Walkerville 25
Bridgewater – Gagebrook 25
Malak – Marrara 25
Eurobodalla Hinterland 24
Mount Annan – Currans Hill 24
Lorne – Anglesea 24
Bundoora – East 24
Beaconsfield – Officer 24
Taylors Lakes 24
Bracken Ridge 24
Enoggera 24
Trinity Beach – Smithfield 24
Norman Gardens 24
Broadbeach Waters 24
Mount Warren Park 24
Gawler – North 24
Hazelmere – Guildford 24
The Vines 24
Beeliar – Wattleup 24
Murdoch – Kardinya 24
Parap 24
Giralang 24
Gordon (ACT) 24
Lyons (ACT) 24
Narara 23
Orange – North 23
Deniliquin 23
Pagewood – Hillsdale – Daceyville 23
Willoughby – Castle Cove – Northbridge 23
Glenmore Park – Regentville 23
Pennant Hills – Cheltenham 23
Kilmore – Broadford 23
Keilor 23
Point Nepean 23
Parkinson – Drewvale 23
Whitfield – Edge Hill 23
Stanthorpe Region 23
Tamborine – Canungra 23
Beaudesert 23
Rochedale South – Priestdale 23
Sarina 23
Clontarf 23
Charters Towers 23
Mount Louisa 23
Bundaberg North – Gooburrum 23
Modbury Heights 23
Peterborough – Mount Remarkable 23
Mandurah – North 23
Byford 23
Success – Hammond Park 23
Leanyer 23
Wanniassa 23
Kariong 22
Lithgow Region 22
Taree Region 22
Albury – North 22
Narrabri 22
Ballina Region 22
Castle Hill – North 22
Elderslie – Harrington Park 22
Oyster Bay – Como – Jannali 22
Daylesford 22
Endeavour Hills – South 22
Somerville 22
Yarrawonga 22
Brighton (Qld) 22
Mansfield (Qld) 22
Brookfield – Kenmore Hills 22
Clifton Beach – Kewarra Beach 22
Banana 22
Pacific Pines – Gaven 22
Springfield Lakes 22
Loganholme – Tanah Merah 22
Wamuran 22
Northern Highlands 22
Glass House Mountains 22
Woodcroft 22
Barmera 22
Mannum 22
Renmark Region 22
Manjimup 22
Falcon – Wannanup 22
Bicton – Palmyra 22
Kambalda – Coolgardie – Norseman 22
Summerhill – Prospect 22
Melba 22
Ainslie 22
Beresfield – Hexham 21
Lambton – New Lambton 21
Culburra Beach 21
St Georges Basin – Erowal Bay 21
Homebush Bay – Silverwater 21
Horsley Park – Kemps Creek 21
Holsworthy – Wattle Grove 21
Avoca 21
Mansfield (Vic.) 21
Greensborough 21
Sunbury 21
Mickleham – Yuroke 21
Croydon South 21
Vermont South 21
Corangamite – South 21
Wishart 21
Ashmore 21
Ipswich – North 21
Camira – Gailes 21
Buderim – South 21
Wurtulla – Birtinya 21
Svensson Heights – Norville 21
Hallett Cove 21
Mallala 21
Victor Harbor 21
Tatiara 21
Waikerie 21
Middle Swan – Herne Hill 21
Scarborough 21
Yokine – Coolbinia – Menora 21
Clarkson 21
McKail – Willyung 21
Brookton 21
Geraldton – East 21
Morawa 21
Howrah – Tranmere 21
Berriedale – Chigwell 21
West Moonah 21
Bruce 21
Watson 21
Braidwood 20
Bega-Eden Hinterland 20
Niagara Park – Lisarow 20
Point Clare – Koolewong 20
Tuggerah – Kangy Angy 20
Warnervale – Wadalba 20
Wellington 20
Cessnock Region 20
Albion Park – Macquarie Pass 20
Shellharbour – Oak Flats 20
Casino Region 20
Narrandera 20
Galston – Laughtondale 20
Lindfield – Roseville 20
Woolaware – Burraneer 20
Menai – Lucas Heights – Woronora 20
Castlemaine Region 20
Churchill 20
Wynnum West – Hemmant 20
Johnstone 20
Goondiwindi 20
Elanora 20
Coomera 20
Raceview 20
Shailer Park 20
Collinsville 20
Croydon – Etheridge 20
Weipa 20
Bohle Plains 20
North Adelaide 20
Wakefield – Barunga West 20
Mindarie – Quinns Rocks – Jindalee 20
Como 20
Calista 20
St Helens – Scamander 20
Downer 20
Edgeworth – Cameron Park 19
Sans Souci – Ramsgate 19
Toorak 19
Wantirna 19
Narre Warren North 19
Langwarrin 19
Stawell 19
Redland Islands 19
Mermaid Waters 19
Hope Island 19
Mount Pleasant – Glenella 19
Maroochy Hinterland 19
Burnside – Wattle Park 19
Mawson Lakes – Globe Derby Park 19
Christies Beach 19
North Haven 19
Grant 19
Augusta 19
Greenfields 19
Halls Head – Erskine 19
South Perth – Kensington 19
Invermay 19
Flynn (NT) 19
Isaacs 19
Blue Haven – San Remo 18
Coonabarabran 18
Branxton – Greta – Pokolbin 18
Albury – South 18
Tocumwal – Finley – Jerilderie 18
Pitt Town – McGraths Hill 18
Maroubra – South 18
Maroubra – West 18
Peakhurst – Lugarno 18
North Sydney – Lavender Bay 18
Alexandra 18
Balwyn North 18
Mentone 18
Mernda 18
Keilor East 18
Vermont 18
Mount Evelyn 18
Boondall 18
Morningside – Seven Hills 18
Yorkeys Knob – Machans Beach 18
Gordonvale – Trinity 18
Balonne 18
Millmerran 18
Andergrove – Beaconsfield 18
Kilcoy 18
Charleville 18
Far South West 18
Beerwah 18
Dalrymple 18
Deeragun 18
Mundingburra 18
Kingaroy Region – South 18
Craignish – Dundowran Beach 18
Salisbury East 18
Blackwood 18
Flagstaff Hill 18
Kangaroo Island 18
Coolbellup 18
Lindisfarne – Rose Bay 18
South Hobart – Fern Tree 18
Moil 18
Wanguri 18
Red Hill (ACT) 18
Monash 18
Wamberal – Forresters Beach 17
Blayney 17
Kurri Kurri – Abermain 17
Wingham 17
Inverell Region – East 17
Gunnedah Region 17
Belmont South – Blacksmiths 17
Hornsby – West 17
Avalon – Palm Beach 17
Bright – Mount Beauty 17
Beaumaris 17
Carrum – Patterson Lakes 17
Tullamarine 17
Cobram 17
Sheldon – Mount Cotton 17
Roma 17
Parkhurst – Kawana 17
Currumbin Waters 17
Coombabah 17
Paradise Point – Hollywell 17
Carrara 17
Springwood 17
North Mackay 17
Bli Bli 17
Newtown (Qld) 17
Ingham Region 17
Cranbrook 17
Magnetic Island 17
Bundaberg Region – South 17
Withers – Usher 17
Pemberton 17
Craigie – Beldon 17
York – Beverley 17
Kalgoorlie – North 17
Perth – Evandale 17
Huonville – Franklin 17
Lyons (NT) 17
Casey 17
Franklin 17
Palmerston 17
Mawson 17
Chittaway Bay – Tumbi Umbi 16
Mudgee 16
Korora – Emerald Beach 16
Quirindi 16
Stockton – Fullerton Cove 16
Oatley – Hurstville Grove 16
Balwyn 16
Surrey Hills (East) – Mont Albert 16
Emerald – Cockatoo 16
Burnside 16
Point Cook – North 16
Moyne – West 16
Carindale 16
Tarragindi 16
Middle Park – Jamboree Heights 16
Inglewood – Waggamba 16
Jacobs Well – Alberton 16
Riverview 16
Rothwell – Kippa-Ring 16
Barcaldine – Blackall 16
Buderim – North 16
Annandale 16
Ashfield – Kepnock 16
Kilkivan 16
Golden Grove 16
Barossa – Angaston 16
Waroona 16
Pinjarra 16
Booragoon 16
Cunderdin 16
Toodyay 16
Newman 16
Cambridge 16
Montrose – Rosetta 16
Evatt 16
Flynn (ACT) 16
Nicholls 16
Jervis Bay 16
Batemans Bay 15
Cowra Region 15
Orange Region 15
Dubbo – West 15
Bonnells Bay – Silverwater 15
Merewether – The Junction 15
Evans Head 15
Balgowlah – Clontarf – Seaforth 15
Caringbah 15
Torquay 15
South Morang (South) 15
Cleveland 15
Mount Sheridan 15
Rockhampton Region – West 15
Runaway Bay 15
Worongary – Tallai 15
Oxenford – Maudsland 15
Main Beach 15
Munruben – Park Ridge South 15
Elimbah 15
Longreach 15
Northern Beaches 15
Townsville – South 15
Gympie – South 15
Aberfoyle Park 15
Eyre Peninsula 15
Goolwa – Port Elliot 15
College Grove – Carey Park 15
East Bunbury – Glen Iris 15
Donnybrook – Balingup 15
Carramar 15
Bull Creek 15
Geraldton – North 15
Moonah 15
Mount Nelson – Dynnyrne 15
Southern Midlands 15
Holt 15
Harrison 15
Batemans Bay – South 14
Helensburgh 14
Wentworth – Buronga 14
Deniliquin Region 14
Tenterfield 14
Hill Top – Colo Vale 14
Moss Vale – Berrima 14
St Leonards – Naremburn 14
Bayview – Elanora Heights 14
Maffra 14
Ivanhoe 14
Doreen 14
Kilsyth 14
Endeavour Hills – North 14
Wheelers Hill 14
Nhill Region 14
Thornlands 14
Geebung 14
Camp Hill 14
The Gap 14
Crows Nest – Rosalie 14
Clifton – Greenmount 14
Warwick 14
Gracemere 14
Broadsound – Nebo 14
Burpengary – East 14
Dayboro 14
Moffat Beach – Battery Hill 14
Marcoola – Mudjimba 14
Sunshine Beach 14
Branyan – Kensington 14
Glenside – Beaumont 14
Roleystone 14
Yangebup 14
Melville 14
Singleton – Golden Bay – Secret Harbour 14
Risdon Vale 14
Rokeby 14
Sorell – Richmond 14
Acton – Upper Burnie 14
East Devonport 14
Macquarie 14
Eden 13
Jilliby – Yarramalong 13
Dorrigo 13
Tuncurry 13
Corowa Region 13
Armidale Region – South 13
Inverell Region – West 13
Junee 13
Newport – Bilgola 13
Cecil Hills 13
Sylvania – Taren Point 13
Nagambie 13
Myrtleford 13
Glen Iris – East 13
Kinglake 13
Plenty – Yarrambat 13
Wattle Glen – Diamond Creek 13
Airport West 13
Rowville – North 13
Croydon Hills – Warranwood 13
Mount Dandenong – Olinda 13
Rockbank – Mount Cottrell 13
West Wimmera 13
Swan Hill Region 13
Camperdown 13
Pallara – Willawong 13
Clayfield 13
White Rock 13
Chinchilla 13
Burleigh Waters 13
Karalee – Barellan Point 13
Beenleigh 13
Woodford – D’Aguilar 13
Golden Beach – Pelican Waters 13
South Townsville – Railway Estate 13
Point Vernon 13
Lobethal – Woodside 13
Happy Valley 13
Capel 13
Dardanup 13
North Perth 13
Canning Vale – West 13
Little Grove – Elleker 13
Plantagenet 13
Dowerin 13
Port Hedland 13
Lenah Valley – Mount Stuart 13
West Hobart 13
Ravenswood 13
Youngtown – Relbia 13
George Town 13
Woolner – Bayview – Winnellie 13
Alawa 13
Jingili 13
Scullin 13
Hackett 13
Chisholm 13
Berry – Kangaroo Valley 12
Huskisson – Vincentia 12
West Pennant Hills 12
Forestville – Killarney Heights 12
Wentworth Falls 12
Ocean Grove – Barwon Heads 12
Leongatha 12
Templestowe Lower 12
Doncaster East (North) 12
Sandringham – Black Rock 12
Romsey 12
Donvale – Park Orchards 12
Shepparton Region – West 12
Wellington Point 12
Chermside West 12
Deagon 12
Miles – Wandoan 12
Merrimac 12
Edens Landing – Holmview 12
Logan Village 12
South Mackay 12
Coolum Beach 12
Oonoonba 12
Granville 12
Aldgate – Stirling 12
Norwood (SA) 12
Goodwood – Millswood 12
Virginia – Waterloo Corner 12
Henley Beach 12
Gilbert Valley 12
Strathalbyn Region 12
Mundaring 12
Heathridge – Connolly 12
Innaloo – Doubleview 12
Serpentine – Jarrahdale 12
Warnbro 12
Kingston Beach – Blackmans Bay 12
Riverside 12
Grindelwald – Lanena 12
Bakewell 12
Richardson 12
Waramanga 12
Weston 12
Yass 11
Box Head – MacMasters Beach 11
Kincumber – Picketts Valley 11
Terrigal – North Avoca 11
Budgewoi – Buff Point – Halekulani 11
Grenfell 11
Dubbo Region 11
Seaham – Woodville 11
Port Kembla Industrial 11
Forster-Tuncurry Region 11
Swansea – Caves Beach 11
Mittagong 11
Parklea – Kellyville Ridge 11
Cromer 11
Picton – Tahmoor – Buxton 11
Caringbah South 11
Portarlington 11
Rowville – Central 11
Ferntree Gully (South) – Upper Ferntree Gully 11
Wandin – Seville 11
Kerang 11
Corangamite – North 11
Victoria Point 11
Carseldine 11
Aspley 11
Kenmore 11
Hawthorne 11
Frenchville – Mount Archer 11
Mount Morgan 11
Mackay Harbour 11
North Lakes – Mango Hill 11
Mountain Creek 11
Millbank – Avoca 11
Booral – River Heads 11
Lyndoch 11
Mosman Park – Peppermint Grove 11
Glen Forrest – Darlington 11
Hillarys 11
Kingsley 11
Karrinyup – Gwelup – Carine 11
Bateman 11
Cooloongup 11
Port Kennedy 11
Moora 11
Kulin 11
Taroona – Bonnet Hill 11
Mowbray 11
Latrobe 11
North West 11
Calwell 11
Fisher 11
Cocos (Keeling) Islands 11
Bathurst Region 10
Windang – Primbee 10
Bulahdelah – Stroud 10
Port Macquarie Region 10
Maryland – Fletcher – Minmi 10
Callala Bay – Currarong 10
Dover Heights 10
The Oaks – Oakdale 10
Blaxland – Warrimoo – Lapstone 10
Springwood – Winmalee 10
Maryborough Region 10
Leopold 10
Point Lonsdale – Queenscliff 10
Beechworth 10
Trafalgar (Vic.) 10
Foster 10
Phillip Island 10
Rosedale 10
Pascoe Vale South 10
Strathmore 10
Greenvale – Bulla 10
Montrose 10
Dromana 10
Rushworth 10
Glenelg (Vic.) 10
Hamilton (Vic.) 10
Stafford Heights 10
Carina Heights 10
Lakes Creek 10
Ripley 10
Bellbird Park – Brookwater 10
Greenbank 10
Far Central West 10
Noosaville 10
Ingham 10
Athelstone 10
Light 10
Nuriootpa 10
Goyder 10
Kadina 10
Coober Pedy 10
Karoonda – Lameroo 10
Lesmurdie – Bickley – Carmel 10
Kwinana Industrial 10
Waikiki 10
Wagin 10
Kalgoorlie Airport 10
South Arm 10
West Launceston 10
West Ulverstone 10
Phillip 10
Queanbeyan – East 9
Saratoga – Davistown 9
Ourimbah – Fountaindale 9
Coramba – Nana Glen – Bucca 9
Lemon Tree Passage – Tanilba Bay 9
Tea Gardens – Hawks Nest 9
Macksville – Scotts Head 9
Old Bar – Manning Point – Red Head 9
Gunnedah 9
Cootamundra 9
Southern Highlands 9
Cherrybrook 9
Strathfield South 9
Bargo 9
Gladesville – Huntleys Point 9
Bendigo Region – South 9
Panton Hill – St Andrews 9
Upwey – Tecoma 9
Point Cook – South 9
Mount Eliza 9
Belmont – Gumdale 9
Wavell Heights 9
Cannon Hill 9
Seventeen Mile Rocks – Sinnamon Park 9
Bellbowrie – Moggill 9
Brinsmead 9
Southern Downs – West 9
Highland Park 9
Esk 9
Springfield 9
Clermont 9
Albany Creek 9
Eatons Hill 9
Petrie 9
Aldinga 9
Clare 9
Naracoorte Region 9
Australind – Leschenault 9
Harvey 9
Claremont (WA) 9
Mount Nasura – Mount Richon – Bedfordale 9
North Coogee 9
Bertram – Wellard (West) 9
Applecross – Ardross 9
Albany Region 9
Prospect Vale – Blackstone 9
Port Sorell 9
Sheffield – Railton 9
Smithton 9
West Coast (Tas.) 9
Lawson 9
Gowrie (ACT) 9
Isabella Plains 9
Duffy 9
Stirling 9
Torrens 9
Condobolin 8
Cowra 8
Urunga 8
Cobar 8
Horsley – Kembla Grange 8
Kiama 8
Gloucester 8
Wangi Wangi – Rathmines 8
West Wallsend – Barnsley – Killingworth 8
Tumut 8
Wagga Wagga – East 8
Castle Hill – South 8
Wahroonga (East) – Warrawee 8
Engadine 8
Bacchus Marsh Region 8
Gordon (Vic.) 8
Newtown (Vic.) 8
Clifton Springs 8
Euroa 8
Templestowe 8
Chelsea Heights 8
Bundoora – North 8
Gowanbrae 8
Koo Wee Rup 8
Merbein 8
Thorneside 8
Murarrie 8
Jondaryan 8
Park Avenue 8
Arundel 8
Bundall 8
Upper Caboolture 8
Lawnton 8
Buddina – Minyama 8
Noosa Heads 8
Nailsworth – Broadview 8
Millicent 8
Loxton 8
Dawesville – Bouvard 8
Helena Valley – Koongamia 8
Greenwood – Warwick 8
Forrestdale – Harrisdale – Piara Waters 8
Denmark 8
Chittering 8
Mukinbudin 8
Austins Ferry – Granton 8
Deloraine 8
Westbury 8
Bruny Island – Kettering 8
Geeveston – Dover 8
Wynyard 8
Hawker 8
Spence 8
Queanbeyan West – Jerrabomberra 7
Young Region 7
Summerland Point – Gwandalan 7
Parkes Region 7
South West Rocks 7
Berowra – Brooklyn – Cowan 7
Hunters Hill – Woolwich 7
Gymea – Grays Point 7
Beaufort 7
Wangaratta Region 7
South Morang (North) 7
Gisborne 7
Riddells Creek 7
Seabrook 7
Ararat Region 7
Mildura Region 7
Buloke 7
Nudgee – Banyo 7
Kuraby 7
Sherwood 7
Mitchelton 7
Bardon 7
Pittsworth 7
Clinton – New Auckland 7
Guanaba – Springbrook 7
Churchill – Yamanto 7
Chambers Flat – Logan Reserve 7
Eimeo – Rural View 7
Slade Point 7
Gowrie (Qld) 7
Highfields 7
Douglas 7
Mount Barker Region 7
Lewiston – Two Wells 7
Greenwith 7
Redwood Park 7
St Agnes – Ridgehaven 7
Willunga 7
Kimba – Cleve – Franklin Harbour 7
Strathalbyn 7
Cottesloe 7
Stratton – Jane Brook 7
Duncraig 7
Trigg – North Beach – Watermans Bay 7
Wembley Downs – Churchlands – Woodlands 7
Two Rocks 7
Yanchep 7
Huntingdale – Southern River 7
Coogee 7
East Fremantle 7
Safety Bay – Shoalwater 7
Gnowangerup 7
Irwin 7
Aranda 7
Cook 7
Crace 7
Forde 7
Yarralumla 7
Bonython 7
Oxley (ACT) 7
Rivett 7
Chifley 7
Pearce 7
Thornton – Millers Forest 6
Scone 6
Albury Region 6
Wentworth-Balranald Region 6
Moama 6
Narrabri Region 6
Temora 6
Banksmeadow 6
Heathcote 6
Bannockburn 6
Yea 6
Rutherglen 6
Towong 6
Edithvale – Aspendale 6
Wallan 6
Chirnside Park 6
Mount Martha 6
Moyne – East 6
McDowall 6
Freshwater – Stratford 6
Southern Downs – East 6
Boyne Island – Tannum Sands 6
Hillcrest 6
Middle Ridge 6
Marino – Seaview Downs 6
McLaren Vale 6
Bullsbrook 6
Sorrento – Marmion 6
Alkimos – Eglinton 6
Camillo – Champion Lakes 6
High Wycombe 6
Banjup 6
Geraldton – South 6
New Norfolk 6
Margate – Snug 6
Norwood (Tas.) 6
Central Highlands 6
Romaine – Havenview 6
Somerset 6
Darwin Airport 6
Gray 6
Kingston (ACT) 6
Gilmore 6
Holder 6
Curtin 6
Muswellbrook Region 5
Hay 5
Wagga Wagga – North 5
Sussex Inlet – Berrara 5
Ulladulla Region 5
Golden Plains – North 5
Woodend 5
Golden Plains – South 5
Winchelsea 5
Longford – Loch Sport 5
Eagle Farm – Pinkenba 5
Rockhampton Region – East 5
Morayfield 5
Cambooya – Wyreema 5
Heatley 5
Reynella 5
West Beach 5
Tanunda 5
Yorke Peninsula – South 5
City Beach 5
Swanbourne – Mount Claremont 5
Iluka – Burns Beach 5
Mullaloo – Kallaroo 5
Woodvale 5
Kings Meadows – Punchbowl 5
Legana 5
Beauty Point – Beaconsfield 5
Cygnet 5
Coonamble 4
Narromine 4
Anna Bay 4
Tamworth – West 4
Lennox Head – Skennars Head 4
Tomerong – Wandandian – Woollamia 4
Rouse Hill – Beaumont Hills 4
Turramurra 4
Camden – Ellis Lane 4
West Hoxton – Middleton Grange 4
Creswick – Clunes 4
Maiden Gully 4
Strathfieldsaye 4
Bendigo Region – North 4
Benalla Region 4
Mount Baw Baw Region 4
Brighton East 4
Research – North Warrandyte 4
Whittlesea 4
Niddrie – Essendon West 4
Lysterfield 4
Rowville – South 4
Ringwood North 4
Monbulk – Silvan 4
Pearcedale – Tooradin 4
Gannawarra 4
Lockington – Gunbower 4
Ormiston 4
Bridgeman Downs 4
Riverhills 4
Keperra 4
Balmoral 4
Bulimba 4
Auchenflower 4
Stanthorpe 4
Bouldercombe 4
Telina – Toolooa 4
Biggera Waters 4
Pimpama 4
Wolffdene – Bahrs Scrub 4
Ooralea – Bakers Creek 4
Sippy Downs 4
Aroona – Currimundi 4
Wulguru – Roseneath 4
Le Hunte – Elliston 4
Roxby Downs 4
Yankalilla 4
Kingston – Robe 4
Murray Bridge Region 4
The Coorong 4
Dalyellup 4
Bridgetown – Boyup Brook 4
Tapping – Ashby – Sinagra 4
Leeming 4
Willagee 4
Bayonet Head – Lower King 4
Narrogin 4
Waratah 4
East Point 4
McKellar 4
Bonner 4
Banks 4
Theodore 4
Molonglo – North 4
Norfolk Island 4
Bombala 3
Cooma Region 3
Broulee – Tomakin 3
Avoca Beach – Copacabana 3
Oberon 3
Parkes (NSW) 3
West Wyalong 3
Mudgee Region – East 3
Gilgandra 3
Singleton Region 3
Kiama Downs – Minnamurra 3
Kiama Hinterland – Gerringong 3
Thirroul – Austinmer – Coalcliff 3
Corowa 3
Armidale Region – North 3
Redhead 3
Valentine – Eleebana 3
Gundagai 3
Robertson – Fitzroy Falls 3
Glenhaven 3
Pymble 3
Terrey Hills – Duffys Forest 3
Blue Mountains – South 3
Warragamba – Silverdale 3
Winston Hills 3
North Ryde – East Ryde 3
Alfredton 3
White Hills – Ascot 3
Yackandandah 3
Paynesville 3
Yarram 3
Flemington Racecourse 3
Kew East 3
Ivanhoe East – Eaglemont 3
Dingley Village 3
Point Cook – East 3
Flinders 3
Horsham Region 3
Yarriambiack 3
Irymple 3
Red Cliffs 3
Rochester 3
Shepparton Region – East 3
Southern Grampians 3
Otway 3
Wakerley 3
Everton Park 3
Rochedale – Burbank 3
Algester 3
Jindalee – Mount Ommaney 3
Chelmer – Graceville 3
Indooroopilly 3
Upper Kedron – Ferny Grove 3
Norman Park 3
Grange 3
Hendra 3
Emu Park 3
Glenlee – Rockyview 3
Kin Kora – Sun Valley 3
Clear Island Waters 3
Karana Downs 3
Cornubia – Carbrook 3
Shoal Point – Bucasia 3
Murrumba Downs – Griffin 3
Peregian Beach – Marcus Beach 3
Peregian Springs 3
Diddillibah – Rosemount 3
Rangeville 3
Adelaide Hills 3
Nairne 3
Toorak Gardens 3
Belair 3
Clarendon 3
Coromandel Valley 3
Fulham 3
Jamestown 3
Port Pirie Region 3
Wallaroo 3
Yorke Peninsula – North 3
Quorn – Lake Gilles 3
Loxton Region 3
Currambine – Kinross 3
Padbury 3
Carabooda – Pinjar 3
Mundijong 3
Casuarina – Wandi 3
Esperance Region 3
Brighton – Pontville 3
Trevallyn 3
Scottsdale – Bridport 3
Forestier – Tasman 3
Triabunna – Bicheno 3
Penguin – Sulphur Creek 3
Quoiba – Spreyton 3
Anula 3
Wagaman 3
Moulden 3
Rosebery – Bellamack 3
Latham 3
Deakin 3
Chapman 3
Farrer 3
Deua – Wadbilliga 0
Wollangambe – Wollemi 0
Nyngan – Warren 0
Maitland – North 0
Illawarra Catchment Reserve 0
Lord Howe Island 0
Walcha 0
Newcastle Port – Kooragang 0
Terranora – North Tumblegum 0
Tumbarumba 0
Ettrema – Sassafras – Budawang 0
Castle Hill – East 0
Castle Hill – West 0
Acacia Gardens 0
Prospect Reservoir 0
Port Botany Industrial 0
Sydney Airport 0
Centennial Park 0
Maroubra – North 0
Chullora 0
Holsworthy Military Area 0
Blue Mountains – North 0
Erskine Park 0
Rookwood Cemetery 0
Smithfield Industrial 0
Yennora Industrial 0
North Rocks 0
Putney 0
Badgerys Creek 0
Wetherill Park Industrial 0
Lilli Pilli – Port Hacking – Dolans Bay 0
Heathcote – Waterfall 0
Royal National Park 0
Loftus – Yarrawarrah 0
Woronora Heights 0
Buninyong 0
Smythes Creek 0
Upper Yarra Valley 0
Chiltern – Indigo Valley 0
Alps – East 0
Lake King 0
French Island 0
Wilsons Promontory 0
Yallourn North – Glengarry 0
Alps – West 0
West Melbourne 0
Port Melbourne Industrial 0
Aspendale Gardens – Waterways 0
Braeside 0
Moorabbin Airport 0
Hurstbridge 0
Essendon Airport 0
Macedon 0
Melbourne Airport 0
The Basin 0
Skye – Sandhurst 0
St Arnaud 0
Moira 0
Colac Region 0
Brisbane Port – Lytton 0
Brisbane Airport 0
Westlake 0
Fig Tree Pocket 0
Pinjarra Hills – Pullenvale 0
Corinda 0
Enoggera Reservoir 0
Mount Coot-tha 0
Albion 0
Ascot 0
Wilston 0
Lamb Range 0
Wooroonooran 0
Shoalwater Bay 0
Callemondah 0
South Trees 0
Reedy Creek – Andrews 0
Benowa 0
Lake Manchester – England Creek 0
Carole Park 0
New Chum 0
Greenbank Military Camp 0
East Mackay 0
Eungella Hinterland 0
Cape Conway 0
Belgian Gardens – Pallarenda 0
North Burnett 0
Hahndorf – Echunga 0
Uraidla – Summertown 0
One Tree Hill 0
Dry Creek – North 0
Parafield 0
Highbury – Dernancourt 0
Sheidow Park – Trott Park 0
Happy Valley Reservoir 0
Lonsdale 0
Dry Creek – South 0
Torrens Island 0
Adelaide Airport 0
Moonta 0
Western 0
Whyalla – North 0
Penola 0
Wattle Range 0
Davenport 0
Gelorup – Stratham 0
Floreat 0
Kings Park (WA) 0
Noranda 0
Chidlow 0
Malmalling – Reservoir 0
Avon Valley National Park 0
Gidgegannup 0
Malaga 0
Melaleuca – Lexia 0
Walyunga National Park 0
Ocean Reef 0
Herdsman 0
Osborne Park Industrial 0
Neerabup National Park 0
Ashendon – Lesley 0
Kewdale Commercial 0
Perth Airport 0
Canning Vale Commercial 0
Welshpool 0
Bibra Industrial 0
Bibra Lake 0
Henderson 0
Jandakot 0
O’Connor (WA) 0
Hope Valley – Postans 0
Winthrop 0
Rockingham Lakes 0
Kojonup 0
Stirling Range National Park 0
Murray 0
Trafalgar (WA) 0
Old Beach – Otago 0
Geilston Bay – Risdon 0
Mount Wellington 0
Waverley – St Leonards 0
Hadspen – Carrick 0
Dilston – Lilydale 0
Northern Midlands 0
Flinders and Cape Barren Islands 0
Derwent Valley 0
Wilderness – East 0
Burnie – Ulverstone Region 0
Miandetta – Don 0
Turners Beach – Forth 0
King Island 0
Wilderness – West 0
Buffalo Creek 0
Charles Darwin 0
East Arm 0
Wulagi 0
Koolpinyah 0
Driver 0
Palmerston – South 0
Charnwood 0
Fraser 0
Gooromon 0
Higgins 0
Macgregor (ACT) 0
Weetangera 0
Molonglo Corridor 0
West Belconnen 0
Hume 0
Kowen 0
Canberra Airport 0
Majura 0
Amaroo 0
Hall 0
Mitchell 0
Gungahlin – East 0
Gungahlin – West 0
Jacka 0
Kenny 0
Moncrieff 0
Taylor 0
Throsby 0
Acton 0
Black Mountain 0
Duntroon 0
Parkes (ACT) – North 0
Russell 0
Forrest 0
Griffith (ACT) 0
Lake Burley Griffin 0
Parkes (ACT) – South 0
Barton 0
Conder 0
Fadden 0
Greenway 0
Macarthur 0
Mount Taylor 0
Tuggeranong 0
Tuggeranong – West 0
Scrivener 0
Garran 0
Hughes 0
O’Malley 0
Arboretum 0
Coombs 0
Denman Prospect 0
Molonglo 0
Wright 0
ACT – South West 0
Namadgi 0
Christmas Island 0

TRIGUBOFF REMAINS OPTIMISTIC ABOUT SYDNEY APARTMENTS

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TRIGUBOFF REMAINS OPTIMISTIC ABOUT SYDNEY APARTMENTS

OF COURSE HARRY REMAINS OPTIMISTIC … HE IS NO 1

IF you ever wondered who is in charge of Australia …

HT: “Then I will simply bring in more migrants” … as he beams from ear to ear.  This report appeared in the AFR …

Together with his Mate Xi …

https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/the-overpopulation-of-australia-were-running-out-of-time,11319

For correction:  Harry Triguboff facilitates the export of Our Australian domestic housing Title Deeds. This is his business model; why is this allowed to continue?

TRIGUBOFF REMAINS OPTIMISTIC ABOUT SYDNEY APARTMENTS

Despite blaming government taxes and credit restrictions for weakening foreign buyer demand in Sydney, Harry Triguboff remains positive about Sydney’s apartment market — buying a Zetland site for $80 million.

Triguboff acquired the 1.06-hectare Council Depot site at 94-104 Epsom Road, Zetland. The site offers potential to construct a 12-storey building with around 300 apartments in an area reportedly popular with foreign buyers.

The adjacent $13 billion Green Square renewal project has created an epicentre for potentially thousands of new apartments. Regulations on investor loans have limited buyers, but the hotel magnate said that his current towers hold little to no vacancies, and he has confidence in inner-city Zetland.

“Following on from the huge success of our Symphony development next door, I have every bit of confidence this new site will also be well received by the market,” he said.

Related reading: Triguboff Sells More Apartments, Warns Against Falling Foreign Property Buyers

230 Sussex Street

Related reading: Vacant Block to Transform into Green Square Community Space

Already in construction, the Meriton brand awaits a new 30-storey tower at 230 Sussex Street, designed by Crone Architects.

Towering 115 metres, the 230 Sussex Street hotel will feature 201 hotel suites and 100 residential apartments, with ground floor services amid a sunlit four-storey high lobby and courtyard.

Triguboff purchased the hotel’s site in 2015 for $60 million, acquiring the neighbouring historic Foley Brothers site for $15 million after to consolidate a larger site. The Foley Brothers site was previously owned by pollster and Haoma Mining Chair Gary Morgan.

Crone won a competition in 2016 to create the design for the site, adapting the Foley Brother’s warehouse to accommodate a heritage courtyard and hotel lobby.

“The tower’s strong connection to its heritage context, together with references to the surrounding streetscape were the winning qualities of the design,’ Crone’s lead designer on the project Ariana Rodriguez said.

“Sitting on a sandstone podium, the tower’s proportions are taken from the adjacent heritage building while the tower’s facade continues the theme of old and new with a mix of clear and solid panels positioned so the development can be understood from both a historic and current, urban context.”

Completion of the 230 Sussex Street precinct is expected by May 2019.
Source: https://theurbandeveloper.com/articles/triguboff-remains-optimistic-about-sydney-apartments

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